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  • Personal Well Being - focusing on individual and public wellness and their interdependence. • One course


    UCC-1 Personal Well Being
    FINP 1600 - FINANCIAL WELL BEING Course Description

    Financial well-being is designed to promote financial literacy among students in order to allow them to increase their overall financial, economic and social well-being. Consumers operate in a buyer beware marketplace and must be financially literate in order to achieve and maximize their own well-being and security. This course covers the basic financial planning process and will help students obtain a working knowledge of creating an investment portfolio, filing taxes, risk management, insurance, credit scores, credit reports, debt management, retirement planning and time value of money. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    KNES 1000 - ACTV LIFESTYLS HEALTH Course Description

    The aim of this course is to support the realization that a physically active lifestyle promotes a lifetime awareness of healthy behaviors. The focus of this course is to develop a dynamic relationship between personal health and physical activity. Selected health issues are investigated in conjunction with active student participation in a specific physical activity.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 1100 - HEALTHY U Course Description

    This course is about the care and maintenance of you. How healthy we are throughout our lives depends in large part on our health behaviors. this course will help you to make healthier decisions in key areas including mental health and stress management, sexuality, addiction, diet, weight management and fitness. Through critical evaluation of information and its application to your personal wellness, it aims to support a lifelong healthier you.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 1300 - HEALTHY LIVING AFTER 30 Course Description

    This course is designed for adult students interested in developing better skills for managing their health. The course will examine various components of health as they apply to adults, ages 30 and older. Topics include mental health and stress management, caring for the health of parents and children, challenges to diet and exercise, sexuality and relationships, management of chronic diseases, managing personal health costs, and examination of issues related to death and dying.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 1600 - ETHICAL WELL BEING Course Description

    Most people think of ethics as the study of figuring out the right thing to do in difficult situations. That is a main part of ethics. But ethics also considers what the best kind of life is and how we go about finding that life. Having a full ethical life means asking ourselves questions, such as: Do we have to seek out values or can we find them in a book? How do we make ourselves fit into the best kind of life? How can we be excellent and what is excellence? What stops us from doing evil or from achieving goodness or excellence? What constitutes genuine fulfillment and happiness? In this course, we will read historical and contemporary authors who asked those kinds of questions. We will also learn the practical skills involved in ethics, such as thinking, critically about ethical dilemmas, evaluating common problems, and developing our own views of ethical life. We will also consider what kinds of societal laws and institutions best help us fulfill our personal ethics and make for an ethical world. The goal of the course is for students to come away with an understanding of tradional views of ethics, practical resources for their own ethical lives, and the ability to think critically, imaginatively, and sympathetically about diverse viewpoints and about their own place in the world.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1250 - LAW IN EVERYDAY LIFE Course Description

    Law affects our rights, our security, and our social, economic, political, and emotional well-being. A basic legal principle states that "ignorance of the law is no excuse"; therefore, students -- and good citizensgenerally -- must have a basic understanding of the legal system and the laws likely to affect their lives. This course introduces the U.S. court systems where legal issues are adjudicated, as well as areas of criminal and civil law such as contracts, leases, personal injury, and civil rights and liberties. Attention will be paid not just to describing laws and legal principles, but to understanding their logic and rationale as well.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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  • Expression - focusing on diverse forms of expression, representation, aesthetics and communication. This Area has three sub-areas: • Arts and Communications – One Course (3 credits ) • Writing – One Course (3 credits ) • Literature – One Course (3 credits )


    UCC-2A Expression-Arts&Comm
    ARTH 1010 - UNDERSTANDING ART Course Description

    A course for non-art majors addressing selected issues in the history of visual arts. Emphasis is placed on visual literacy: teaching students how to speak, write, and think about art. Course content includes a variety of historical periods and deals with visual media such as painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic arts, photography, and film. Not open to art majors.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTH 1030 - ART AND POLITICS Course Description

    A course for non-art majors addressing selected periods and issues in politically inspired/reflective visual arts. Emphasis is placed on the connections between visual arts and politics, and how the political is reflected, discussed and even mediated in visual works. The course will teach students how to speak, write, and think about the inter-relationships between art and politics. Course content addresses a variety of historical periods and visual arts.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 1010 - EXPERIENCING THEATER Course Description

    An introduction to the historical, cultural and practical facets of theatrical productions and plays. This course enables students to experience the dramatic process in all its richness. The purchase of tickets is required.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 1100 - COMMUNICATION IN ACTION Course Description

    A study of oral communication as an interpersonal and dynamic process. Students engage in communication experiencea designed to develop understanding of and skill in public and interpersonal communication.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2340 - FILM AS A MEDIUM Course Description

    This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the narrative structures and formal characteristics of film as a visual/aural medium of communication. This course will examine how formal elements such as camera angle, lighting, color, camera movement and editing are used as creative tools of visual expression to help generate or reinforce narrative meanings.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2630 - PUBLIC SPEAKING Course Description

    Students learn the theory and skills of preparing and presenting public speeches. Emphasis is on practice and criticism of classroom speaking experiences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 1150 - UNDERSTANDING MUSIC Course Description

    The course will introduce students to music's role as an art form and as an expression of the human experience including the meaning and value of music within societies and individual lives within a historiical setting. Music from a variety of genres, styles, time periods and geographical locations of origin wll be studied, as well as the manner in which the elements of music are utilized within these settings. The course will include the development of attentive listening skills and effective cmmunicaito about music.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 1240 - MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS Course Description

    Designed for the beginning student with little or no previous musical training. Through involvement with various tasks and activities, students master the basic skills of music reading, sight-singing and keyboard facilty and gain a knowledge of related theoretical concepts.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2150 - UNDERSTANDING JAZZ Course Description

    This course examines jazz history and the development of jazz styles as part of a broad framework of significant events and cultural trends in american history. It explores jazz as a product of African-American culture along with other relevant cultures, and examines the ties of jazz to economic, political, and social dimensions of ameria society. Significant jazz recordings and jazz musicians are surveyed and development of jazz styles is examined in historical context. How jazz is played and learned is also examined, including how improvisation, instrumentation, repertoire, and style function in a jazz performance.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-2B Expression Writing
    ENG 1100 - COLLEGE WRITING Course Description

    A workshop course in which students develop pieces of writing, taking them through various stages of planning and revision. Students share their writing with the instructor and their peers, get feedback on drafts, and consider this feedback as they progress through the writing process. This course develops students' writing competency on the college level. Prerequisite: ENG 1080

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-2C Expression Literature
    ASN 2040 - EAST ASIAN LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course intorduces students to some canonical East Asian literary works in three major genres-fiction poetry, and drama. We will analyze literary elements and techniques and explore social, cultural, political, and global influences that have shaped East Asian writing. Class is taught in English. Prerequisites: ENG 1080 AND (BRI 1090 OR ENG 1100)

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CHIN 2040 - EAST ASIAN LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course intorduces students to some canonical East Asian literary works in three major genres-fiction poetry, and drama. We will analyze literary elements and techniques and explore social, cultural, political, and global influences that have shaped East Asian writing. Class is taught in English. Prerequisite: ENG 1080 OR BRI 1090 OR ENG 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ENG 1500 - EXPERIENCES IN LITERATURE Course Description

    Develops the student's appreciation and enjoyment of selected works in fiction, drama, and poetry. Works selected represent different historical periods and cultures. Substantial writing is required. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LANG 1410 - WORLD LIT: MODERN & CONTEMP Course Description

    An introduction and exploration of modern and contemporary world literature which concentrates in the diverse production of four large areas in the world: Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. The course aims at developing the student's appreciation for literature focusing in works of poetry, essay, fiction, and drama; while highlighting the major authors, literary trends, thematic patterns and diveristy of voices. Particular attention willbe given to the task of literature as an expressionn of a society's values and ideals and/or as a challenge to the status quo. This course is taught in English.. Prerequisite: ENG 1080 AND ENG 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LANG 2200 - DETECTIVE FICTION ACROSS AMER Course Description

    This course will study detective fiction that focuses on Anglo American, Latin American, African American and US Latinos authors. Our purpose is threefold: to compare detective fiction from different regions across the Americas; to see how these texts construct and examine the concept of knowledge; to understand what role sex and race play in these narratives. Possible authors include: Edgar A. Poe, Jorge L. Borges, Dashiell Hammett, Lucha Corpi, Leonardo Padura, Chester Himes, among others. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 2200 - DETECTIVE FICTION ACROSS AMER Course Description

    This course will study detective fiction that focuses on Anglo American, Latin American, African American and US Latinos authors. Our purpose is threefold: to compare detective fiction from different regions across the Americas; to see how these texts construct and examine the concept of knowledge; to understand what role sex and race play in these narratives. Possible authors include: Edgar A. Poe, Jorge L. Borges, Dashiell Hammett, Lucha Corpi, Leonardo Padura, Chester Himes, among others.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 2330 - LATIN AMER LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course examines Latin American writers and their contributions to world literature. Analyzing various literary genres, which may include short fiction, poetry, testimony or the novel, the course explores social, cultural, political, economic, and global influences that have shaped Latin American writing. Emphasis is placed on figures like: Pablo Neruda, Jorge L. Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Roberto Bolaño, Clarice Lispector, Cesar Vallejo, Cristina Peri Rossi, Isabel Allende, Diamela Eltit, Juan C. Onetti, Carlos Fuentes, García Márquez, Jose Martí, Gabriela Mistral, among others. This course is taught in English but Spanish majors who take it as directed elective are required to complete the writing intensive component in Spanish.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SPAN 2200 - DETECTIVE FICTION ACROSS AMER Course Description

    This course will study detective fiction that focuses on Anglo American, Latin American, African American and US Latinos authors. Our purpose is threefold: to compare detective fiction from different regions across the Americas; to see how these texts construct and examine the concept of knowledge; to understand what role sex and race play in these narratives. Possible authors include: Edgar A. Poe, Jorge L. Borges, Dashiell Hammett, Lucha Corpi, Leonardo Padura, Chester Himes, among others. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SPAN 2330 - LATIN AMER LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course examines Latin American writers and their contributions to world literature. Analyzing various literary genres, which may include short fiction, poetry, testimony or the novel, the course explores social, cultural, political, economic, and global influences that have shaped Latin American writing. Emphasis is placed on figures like: Pablo Neruda, Jorge L. Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Roberto Bolaño, Clarice Lispector, Cesar Vallejo, Cristina Peri Rossi, Isabel Allende, Diamela Eltit, Juan C. Onetti, Carlos Fuentes, García Márquez, Jose Martí, Gabriela Mistral, among others. This course is taught in English but Spanish majors who take it as directed elective are required to complete the writing intensive component in Spanish.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



     
  • Ways of Knowing - focusing on diverse modes of knowledge and perspectives about the natural and human world and their implications. This Area has five sub-areas: • Philosophical perspectives – One Course (3 credits) • Historical perspectives – One Course (3 credits) • Social and Behavioral Sciences – Two Courses (6 credits ) • Scientific perspectives – One Course (4 credits , includes laboratory) • Quantitative thinking – One Course (3 credits )


    UCC-3A Ways Know Philosophical
    PHIL 1100 - INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY Course Description

    Representative problems of philosophy, ranging from methods of inquiry, moral dilemmas, religious knowledge, problems of existence, artistic judgment and criticism to political and social philosophy.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 1120 - PHILOSOPHY OF THE FUTURE Course Description

    We are intensely concerened about the future at three main levels. The first level is prsonal: What will my future on eart be like? What will happen to me after I die? The second level is communal: What will happen to the human race? Will civilization disintegrate into dystopia or will it make progress towards utopian perfection? The third level cosmic: What is the future of the univrse? Will all life ultimately die out? The philosophical study of the future aims to study the future at each level.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 1500 - CONCEPTS OF THE PERSON Course Description

    What does it mean to be a person? This course brings a philosophical perspective to this question, and also discusses how philosophical and experimental perspectives on this question are connected. Can people be made completely of matter, or do they have immaterial souls too? Can we know what other people's experiences are really like? What defines personal identity? Should we recognize any rational agent as a person, and would that mean we should recognize chimpanzees and futuristic robots as people?

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 2200 - PHIL OF RELIGION Course Description

    This course presents an analytic study of the logical structure of religious thought. This course will cover various traditional and modern theories concerning:(1) the structure of theism (arguments for and against a theistic God); (2)the structure of atheism; (3) alternatives to theism ( such as Neoplatoism, pantheism, or process thogut); (4) the existence and nature of the soul (especially in its relation to the body); (5) various doctrines of immortality (e.g. heaven and hell; disembodied existence; reincarnation; the resurrectin of the body).

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PHIL 2320 - PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY Course Description

    Philosophy of technology studies the structure and purpose of technology. It examines the basic conceptual foundations of technology as a complex system with something like a life of its own. It examines how deep biological and religious drives animate the development of technology. It looks at advanced technologies, especially those that involve modification of the human body or human nature

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1150 - POWER, JUSTICE & FREEDOM Course Description

    This course will survey some of the most fundamental concepts in political theory and philosophy, such as justice, freedom, order, power, inequality, peace and conflict. It will also discuss the philosophical traditions underlie these ideas, such as utilitarianism, materialism, idealism, and others. This course will focus on the ways that different political and moral concepts operate in diverse political traditions and examine the unique ethical and epistemological frameworks that give various political traditions and ideologies their distinctiveness and coherence.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1160 - AFRICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT Course Description

    This course traces the historical evolution of African political thought, emphasizing the philosophical, socio-economic, intellectual and other circumstances that have shaped particular strands of political philosophy amongst thinkers of African origin. This course will help students compare and contrast the way African thought apporaches the questions of human existence and those who have different historical and material experiences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-3B Ways of Know Historical
    ANTH 2100 - INTRO TO ARCHAEOLOGY Course Description

    This course introduces students to the anthropological sub-discipline of archaeology, which is the studyof past human societies as revealed through the recovery and analysis of the material culture and environmental data left behind. Archaeology is essential for learning about prehistoric non-literate societies (which make up over 99% of human history), and archaeological research supplements,confirms and even changes historical analyses based on written records. Archaeology is multidisciplinary in nature, encompassing aspects of the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities and the arts. This course will cover basic method and theory, and survey key events as revealed in the archaeological record over the past 3 million years. It will also address recent applied topics in archaeological research, including community archaeology, heritage sustainability & preservation and cultural resource management. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 1030 - FOUNDATIONS OF CIVILIZATION Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the origins of human civilizations and their development through the 13th century CE in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas. Topics include: the comparitive analysis of the origins of urban societies; the rise of imperial systems; the construction of ethnic, religious and philosophical identities; and conflict, trade, and communication among pre-modern societies. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1010 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writing, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 1040 - THE EARLY MODERN WORLD Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the shaping of the first global age (1200-1800 C.E.). It traces political, economic, social, and cultural developments as well as interactions among the principal regions of the world: Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia during the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern era. Topics will include exploration, conquest, and colonialism; religions co-existence, conflict and conversion; medical, technological, and scientific exchange; economic networks; and war and peace. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1020 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writing, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 1050 - THE MODERN WORLD Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the formation of the modern world from the late 18th century to the present. It traces political, economic, social, and cultural developments and interactions among the principal regions of the world Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas from the Atlantic Revolutions and their aftermath to our contemporary era. Topics include: the American, French and Haitian revolutions, the Latin American independence movements, industrialization, colonialism and anti-colonialism, nationalism, the World Wars and their aftermath, the Cold War, and globalization. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1030 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writng, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-3C Ways Know Soc&Behav Sci
    ANTH 1300 - ORIGINS&DIVERSITY OF HUMANKIND Course Description

    Designed to study humanity from the broadest perspective in the social sciences. Through an introduction to basic concepts in cultural/social anthropology, archaeology, physical anthropology, and linguistics, students gain an appreciation of human evolutionary history, modern cultural diversity, and the elements of social life all humans share. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 2520 - EVOL BASIS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Course Description

    This course explores the evolutionary bases of human behavior from a multidisciplinary perspective. It emphasizes the evolutionary and adaptive biological substrates and predispositions which help account for the complexity of modern humans. Evolutionary principles, comparative anatomical and behavioral evidence, the fossil record, neuroanatomical and the uniquely human archeological record are used to trace the anatomical and behavioral evolution of Homo sapiens. The roots of modern human behavior will be considered from the perspectives of adaptation and antiquity. Students will not only develop a thorough understanding of what it means to be human, but also an extensive knowledge of the environmental and biological forces which shaped the human mind. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ECON 2010 - MACROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES Course Description

    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of macroeconomic analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on the examination of production, expenditure, employment, unemployment and price levels for the economy as a whole. Discussed are also monetary, fiscal, and financial policies, with regards to their impacts on economic growth, inflation, unemployment and financial stability. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ECON 2020 - MICROECONOMIC PRINCIPLES Course Description

    This course discusses the basic economic principles related to the behavior of individual agents. the main topics include the following: 1) Opportunity Cost, 2) Demand and supply analysis, 3) consumer theory, 4) Production and costs, 5) Profit maximization, 6) Market structure ( perfect comptetition , monopoly, monoplistic competition, and oligopoly), 7) Market failure and the distribution of income ad 8) International trade and exchange rates. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 1500 - WORLD GEOGRAPHY Course Description

    This course is organized into two parts as follows: The first part will introduce students to key geographic concepts, theories, themes and methods, and how these concepts and methods can be used to study and interpret the human and physical landscapes of our world. The second part examines the physical and human geographies of major regions of the world in terms of the physical, environmental, economic, social, cultural, and political factors that have shaped and continue to shape their distinctive physical and human geographies. Major regions to be examined include Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, North America, Europe, East Asia, South Asia, Southwestern Asia (the Middle East), and Russia and Neighboring Countries.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 2300 - GLOBAL POPULATION ISSUES Course Description

    This course introduces students to population concepts, theories, methods, issues, and their application to the constantly changing world around us. The course is organized into four parts as follows: The first part introduces students to major global population trends, perspectivesx of population growth, and sources of demographic data. The second part deals with demographic processes including world health, fertility, and migration transformations. The third part examines the effects of population processes such as mortality and migration on society. The fourth part analyzes the relationship between population and the environment at local, regional, and global scales.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LANG 1120 - UNDERSTANDING HUMAN LANGUAGE Course Description

    This foundational course examines human language in terms of its structure, variation, and inherent complexity. Knowledge of the core theoretical concepts of morphology, phonology, syntax, and semantics is applied to various questions about and approaches to the nature of child and adult language acquisition, language processing and impairment, and language contact and change. Tools of linguistic analysis will be used to develop and test hypotheses, and several methodological approaches will be explored. Interdisciplinary in nature and empiricially based, the course touches on topics of relevance to social and behavioral sciences, humanities and education.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1100 - INTRO TO POLITICS Course Description

    An inquiry into the nature, methodology and subject matter of politics. Basic ideas and problems in the field of politics-- value-free inquiry, freedom, authority, justice, equality, alienation, revolution and change, rights and obligation-- are examined in their philosophical and real-world setting. (not required of political science majors.)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1200 - AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Course Description

    This course provides an analysis of the structure and function of basic institutions of American government. The cultural setting, constitutional foundations and policy-making processes are examined in detail. In addition, this course will provide students with a critical understanding of the American political system in comparison to other selected democratic systems in order to prepare them for active and effective citizenship in a democratic society.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 1100 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Course Description

    This course surveys the chief theories, principles, and methodologies of psychology with special emphasis on their relations to human behavior. The biological foundations of behavior, sensory processes, learning, perception, memory, emotion, motivation, personality, and the social bases of behavior and behavior pathology are examined to establish the foundations for advanced study in psychology. Current research findings are included wherever applicable.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 2520 - EVOLUTIONARY BASIS HUM BEHAV Course Description

    This course explores the evolutionary bases of human behavior from a multidisciplinary perspective. It emphasizes the evolutionary and adaptive biological substrates and predispositions which help account For the complexity of modern humans. Evolutionary principles, comparative anatomical and behavioral evidence, the fossil record, neuroanatomical and the uniquely human archeological record are used to trace the anatomical and behavioral evolution of Homo sapiens. The roots of modern human behavior will be considered from the perspectives of adaptation and antiquity. Students will not only develop a thorough understanding of what it means to be human, but also an extensive knowledge of the environmental and biological forces which shaped the human mind. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters only. Prerequisite: PSY 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 1010 - PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY Course Description

    Examines the structure and dynamics of human society and interprets social behavior within the context of modern society and culture. A prerequisite to all other sociology courses unless waived by the instructor. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 1020 - SOCIAL PROBLEMS Course Description

    This course presents fundamental sociological concepts and analyzes major problems of contemporary society, including micro and macro social causes of these problems. We will examine the individual and structural components of society that contextualize behavior while exploring topics such as but not limited to: the social construction and dissemination of power; poverty; racism; ethnic conflict; gendered inequalities; the environment; suburban and urban life; drugs and crime; social deviance; health and body-related issues; the family; and, educaitonal inequality. In addition, we will examine "facts", theories, and methods Sociologists use in the study of social problems. Last, we will also consider how other Nations address problems that are familiar in the United States. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2310 - SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY Course Description

    A sociological approach to the study of marriage and family living. The student is required to develop a critical evaluation of studies and research in the field. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 1800 - GENDERED LIVES & SOCIETIES Course Description

    This course is an introduction to understanding how societies, identities and social relations are shaped by sex, gender and sexuality. It wil explore how gender is a socially constructed concept that affects men and women in different ways and shapes social relations, how gender is related to " race", class, age and disability, and how social institutions reproduce gender inequality.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-3D Ways of Know Scientific
    BIO 1140 - APPLIED A & P Course Description

    A study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on developing an understanding of the interrelationships of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in both health and disease. Emphasis on nervous and endocrine control mechanisms and the muscular and respiratory systems. Required of psychology and speech pathology majors; open to others. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors, or students who have taken any of the following courses: BIO 1120, BIO 1130, BIO 1180, or BIO 1190.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 1180 - BASIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I Course Description

    A study of human anatomy and physiology with emphasis on developing an understanding of the interrelationships of the body systems in maintaining homeostasis in both health and disease. Emphasis on nervous and endocrine control mechanisms and the muscular and respiratory systems. Required of psychology, public health, kinesiology majors and speech pathology majors. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 1200 - HUMAN BIOLOGY Course Description

    This is a course in biological science and research methodology from the perspective of the human body and its systems. The course lays the foundation of knowledge of biology: the chemistry of living organisms, the cell tissues, organs, organ systems and the organism; homeostasis as it applies to human survival; evolutionary processes; genetic, reproductive and other areas of biotechnology; and the human body systems and how they function and malfunction. Biomedical research, the use of humans as research subjects, and other bioethics issues will be addresssed. Research methodology will include the use of scientific method in laboratory exercises, and critical analyises of research studies. Laboratories will include varied exercises in anatomy, physiology, genetics, evolution and an opportunity for students to design their own experiments. Not open to biology majors, biotechnology majors, or students who have taken an Anatomy and Physiology course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 1300 - FIELD BIOLOGY Course Description

    This course will explore the interrelationships among organisms and the environment. Coverage incudes natural history of the major groups of organisms, basic principles of evolution and basic ecological principles with applications of this knowledge to environmental problems. Laboratory exercises focus on field methods to highlight the scientific method by developing hypotheses, collecting data and analyzing results. Not open to biology/biotechnology majors.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 1400 - INTRO ANIMAL BEHAVIOR Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the scientific study of animal behavior. Students will learn about the nature of science, the diversity of animal behavior, its evolution, its underlying physiological mechanisms, and the theoretical basis of our modern understanding of behavior. The course emphasizes the natural behavior of non-human animals but will also considerthe implications of the principles of animal behavior for humans and domestic animals. Labs focus on the scientific method, which students will practice by means of observational and manipulative experiments involving live animals in both laboratory and field settings. Not open to biology majors.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    BIO 1630 - GENERAL BIOLOGY I Course Description

    For students intending to major in biology, and other students who want a strong introduction to the foundations of biology, this course provides a background in biological principles. Similarities and differences between living organisms, both plant and animal, are discussed. Content includes molecular, cellular and subcellular structure and function, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cross-membrane molecular transport, genetics, DNA structure, replication, transcription, and protein syntheses. Required of biology/biotechnolgy majors.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 0310 - COLLEGE CHEMISTRY: LAB Course Description

    This General Education laboratory course, the first semester course in the CHEM 031/CHEM 032 (Organic Biochemistry) sequences, introduces the practice of general chemistry in the laboratory, and the topics covered correspond to the topics covered in the co-requisite lecture course, CHEM 131 (College Chemistry). The course has an orientation toward health sciences. In this first semester course, the primary emphasis is on learning basic laboratory techniques such as quantitative measurements of mass, volume, density, concentration, qualitative analysis, distillation, measurement of the properties of gases, simple compounds, solutions (including acids and bases), factors affecting chemical reactivities, and equilibrium. (1 credit) Corequisite: CHEM 1310

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CHEM 1200 - CHEM IN PERSPECTIVE Course Description

    An introduction to the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry emphasizing its historical development as a human endeavor. The nature of the scientific method is emphasized, along with an elucidation of the pervasive application of chemistry in modern technology and society. The course is intended to acquaint students with the extent to which chemical knowledge is used to sustain our way of life, from the maintenance of the food supply, to the development of pharmaceuticals and materials. The course provides basic knowledge of the nature of atoms and molecules, chemical reactivity and energy, which establishes the foundation for appreciating the chemical world. In addition to this basic information, the course provides a survey of applications of chemistry that impact our daily life.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 1310 - COLLEGE CHEMISTRY Course Description

    This UCC course introduces the major concepts of general chemistry. The course has an orientation toward the health sciences. Key topics covered in the course include: introduction to chemistry and the classification of matter, elements and atomic theory, compounds and chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical reactions, solutions and colloids, reaction rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, and nuclear chemistry. The laboratory component reinforces many of principles introduced in the lecture such as quantitative measurements of mass, volume, density, qualitative analysis, distillation, measurement of the properties of gases, simple compounds, solutions (including solubility, concentration, acids and bases), factors affecting chemical reactivities, and equilibrium. Learning basic techniques in the use of standard laboratory equipment is also a key part of the laboratory component.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 1600 - GEN CHEM I Course Description

    A study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry – encompassing such topics as matter and measurement, atoms, molecules and ions, atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometric calculations, basic thermochemistry and theories of chemical bonding. This course is the introductory chemistry course for chemistry, biology and other quantitatively oriented majors and provides a rigorous introduction to chemistry, the comprehension of which is fundamental to a scientific understanding of the world around us. Prerequisite: MATH 1150 OR MATH 1160 OR MATH 1170 OR MATH 1300 OR MATH 1350

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 1620 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY II Course Description

    A study of the fundamental concepts of chemistry – encompassing such topics as matter and measurement, atoms, molecules and ions, atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometric calculations, basic thermochemistry and theories of chemical bonding. This course is the introductory chemistry course for chemistry, biology and other quantitatively oriented majors and provides a rigorous introduction to chemistry, the comprehension of which is fundamental to a scientific understanding of the world around us. Prerequisite: CHEM 1600 AND CHEM 0600

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENV 1100 - ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY Course Description

    An introduction to the study of environmental sustainablility from the viewpoints of several disciplines of the natural sciences, the social sciences and humanities. These disciplines include biology, chemistry, physics, geology, soils, political science, economics, law, anthropology, sociology, and ethics. The course stresses a holistic view of the environment. The companion workshops include field trips and hands-on experiences that complement the materials in the lecture.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENV 1150 - GENERAL GEOLOGY Course Description

    Includes the study of the origin and evolution of the earth, the rocks and minerals that compose it, the geological processes that are constantly changing it, the origin and evolution of plants and animals that live upon it, and the role of geology in shaping man's environment. Laboratory and field trips introduce rocks, minerals, fossils, maps, and landscape features. Three-hour lecture and discussion and two-and-a-half hour workshop.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1100 - INTRO TO PHYSICS Course Description

    Designed to give the nonscience student an adequate understanding of the nature of science and of the fundamental physical laws that govern our everyday lives. Topics include forces, motion, heat energy, electricity, atomic energy and fundamental ideas in chemistry. Laboratory work is closely integrated with the above topics. Lecture and lab

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1300 - PHYSICS FOR INFORMATION AGE Course Description

    Intended for non-science students, this course provides an introductory survey of the principles that underlie modern communication technology. Topics include applications of classical and quantum physics to the developement of semiconductor integrated circuits, solid-state lasers and optical fibers. This is a descriptive laboratory course without the use of extensive mathematics. The laboratory presents a set of experiments that highlight the physical principles presented in lecture. This is a technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1700 - GENERAL ASTRONOMY Course Description

    A study of our nearest star, the sun, as well as stellar properties and evolution. Star counts and the stucture of our island universe of stars, dust and gas are discussed. The Big Bang and the fate of the universe is covered. Not open to students who have previously taken an astronomy course. Lecture and lab.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1900 - ACOUSTICS AND SOUND Course Description

    The lecture topics provide a description of the fundamental principles of acosustics and sound that include: simple harmonic motion, basic wave phenomena, analysis and synthesis of complex waves, the human ear and voice, basic room and auditorium acoustics, and the basic operating principles of microphones, speakers, and audio equipment. The laboratory presents a set of experiments that highlight the physical principles presented in lecture. Lecture and lab.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 2550 - COLLEGE PHYSICS I Course Description

    An introductory physics course for students who do not intend to specialize in the physical sciences. Requires no mathematics beyond algebra and geometry as prerequisites. Underlying principles and basic laws of Newtonian mechanics, rotational motion, momentum, energy, and thermodynamics are explored. Lecture and lab Prerequisite: MATH 1150 OR MATH 1350 OR MATH 1600

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 2600 - GENERAL PHYSICS I Course Description

    This course provides a broad, rigorous introduction to calculus-based physics for chemistry and computer science majors and is a foundation for all advanced work in physics. Topics inlcude: vectors, motion in straight line, motion in two and three dimension, work and kinetic energy, energy conservation, momentum and impulse, rotation of rigid bodies, dynamics of rotational motion, equilibrium, elasticity, gravitation, and periodic motion. Prerequisite: MATH 1600

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-3E Ways of Knowing Quant
    CSH 2300 - INTEGRATED RES METHDS/STATS II Course Description

    This course focuses on refining a research question, designing appropriate methods to collect data, and data collection using an appropriate sample size. Basic principles of statistics and the utilization of SPSS software to analyze the data are also included in this course. Students will complete the method, results, and discussions sections of their group research projects started in CSH 1300. Prerequisite: CSH 1300 OR CSH 2500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MATH 1090 - MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS Course Description

    This course is intended to provide a wide ranging exposure to mathematical ideas expected of the liberal arts undergraduate. Topics include: Voting, Fair Division, Apportionment, Graphs and Networks, Consumer Finance, Statistics and Probability. The course is designed for students not majoring in business, the sciences or mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1100 - CONTEMPORARY MATH Course Description

    This course is intended to provide a wide ranging exposure to the mathematical ideas expected of a liberal arts graduate. Topics include Sets, Logic, Statistics, Probability, Number Systems and Problem Solving. The course is designed for students not majoring in business, the sciences or mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1160 - PRECALCULUS Course Description

    This course is a comprehensive study of exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Topics include function properties, exponential and logarithmic functions( their properties and graphs), solving exponential and logarithmic equations, trigonometric functions (their properties and graphs), trigonometric identities and solving trignometric equations. Prerequisite: MATH 1150

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1170 - BUSINESS MATH Course Description

    A study of algebraic and transcendental functions, including their properties and graphs with a focus on applications to business. Topics include algebraic fundamentals, equations and inequalities, polynomial functions and graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1300 - ELEMENTARY STATISTICS Course Description

    This course studies the development of statistical concepts with applications to various disciplines. topics include descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. The latter are explained in terms of concets from probblility theory such as normal distribution, t-distribution, sampling theory, estimation, confidence intervals, hypotheis testing, t-test, Chi squate test, analysis of variance and regressiona nd correlation. The software package SPSS is used to perform statistical analysis. Emphasis is on understanding the concepts and problem solving using modern technology. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1350 - ALGEBRA, TRIG AND FUNCTIONS Course Description

    A comprehensive study of algebraic and elementary transcendental functions. topics include the real number system, solving equations and inequalities, function properties, algebraic functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions (their properies and graphs), solving exponential and logarithmic equations, trigonometric functions (their properites and graphs), trigonometric identities and solving rigonometric equations. Prerequisite: MATH 1060

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 1600 - CALCULUS I Course Description

    This course explores calulus techniques and methods and teaches the use of technology to understand topics related to limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Applications of calculus to problem solving in science, mathematics and other related areas are examined. Topics include limits and continuity of functions, the Intermediate Value Thorem, derivatives, differentiation rules, Rolle's Theorem and the Mean Value Theorem, applications of differentiation, antiderivatives, definite integrals and the fundamental theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 1160 OR MATH 1350

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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  • Diversity and Justice - focusing on challenges of difference, equality and justice. •One course (3 credits)


    UCC-4 Diversity&Justice
    ANTH 2020 - DIVERSITY & EQUITY IN SCHOOLS Course Description

    Schools are central to the socialization of youngsters and to the formation and maintenance of modern nation-states. American schools transmit core values and knowledge and support a meritocracy where social mobility seems the outcome of talent and effort. While offering freedom and opportunity, they reproduce social structures and perpetuate systems of class, gender, and race inequality. This course critically analyzes the role that schools play in the cultural production of the "educated" person. It identifies links between school practices and the community, the state, and the economy, which help explain the disproportionate failure of disadvantaged groups. The course challenges future teachers to think about schools as sites of intense cultural politics and to consider the effects of history and power on educational processes. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 2400 - LANGUAGE MATTERS Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. This course is Writing Intensive. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only. Prerequisite:ANTH 1300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 2570 - SEX, GENDER & SEXUALITY Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 2580 - ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Course Description

    An introduction to the histories of Americans of Asian ancestry from the late eighteenth century to the recent past, this course focuses on the experiences of peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Phillipines,Southeast Asia, and South Asia. It explores patterns and similarities in experience, while also addressing differences stemming from nationality, class, gender, and colonial and postcolonial relationships to the United States. Within a broad chronological framework, the course approaches the Asian American experience thematically. Topics will include: the impact of U. S. imperialism on Asian migration; the significance of Asian labor in the development of the American West; anti-Asian movements and exclusion; community formation and ethnic identity; stereotypical images of Asian-Americans, from the Yellow Peril to the Model Minority; urban and suburban experiences; interaction with other ethnicities and social movements; and the forging of a pan-Asian movement in the 1960's.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    AWS 2040 - HARLEM RENAISSANCE Course Description

    This is a course that studies the historical, artistic, and political movement centered in Harlem, New York from the 1910s to the mid 1930s commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. It investigates the diasporic connections between Harlem and both Africa and the Caribbean. In addition, it emphasizes the contributions of women writers to a movement traditionally seen as a largely male preserve. Further, it investigates the fraught relationship between race, sexuality, and artistic expression. Readings may include texts by Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and others. This is a Writing Intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    AWS 2250 - RACE,GENDER & SOC JUSTICE Course Description

    This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIED 2050 - FOUND BILING & MULTICULTRL ED Course Description

    This course will provide participants with the knowledge necessary for understanding the historical, political, legal, social and educational aspects of bilingual and multicultural education and how such knowledge influences teacher practices in Bilingual and ESL progams. Critical discussion of historical and current stuggles for access to education in American history is central to this course. Another key focus of this course is learning about methods through which teachers can effectively explore and celebrate the diversity in language, culture, religion, gender, ability and other areas inherent in American classrooms through engaging in culturally relevant instruction; incorporating meaningful, authentic assessment; and including multiple perspectives throughout the curriculum. New research in the areas of builingual and multicultural educaiton will be examined, and students will analyze and apply best practices based on this research.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2620 - COMMUNICATING FOOD Course Description

    Food is a fundamental dimension of 21st century life, local and global. This class uses food as a lens to examine the structure of our modern world focusing on issues of global health, social justice and environmental justice. Using a variety of approaches, we will examine food as central to social, economic and political life, examining the ways in which social oppression impacts food production, distribution and consumption based on factors of race, gender, and socio-economic class.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ENG 2500 - HARLEM RENAISSANCE Course Description

    This is a course that studies the historical, artistic, and political movement centered in Harlem, New York from the 1910s to the mid 1930s commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. It investigates the diasporic connections between Harlem and both Africa and the Caribbean. In addition, it emphasizes the contributions of women writers to a movement traditionally seen as a largely male preserve. Further, it investigates the fraught relationship between race, sexuality, and artistic expression. Readings may include texts by Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and others. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ENG 3500 - LIT OF AMERICAN CULTURES Course Description

    This course will offer a study of the literature of American cultures with a focus on Native American, Latino/a, Asian American, and African American writers and texts. In its focus on issues of identity(racial-based, class-based, and gender-based), this comparative study of Ethnic American literature explores the ways in which identities are constructed in literary texts. To understand the socio-cultural context of literary works, the course will encourage students to examine the historical background of each author and his/her text as examples of how each respective group responds to life in the United States, in particular its often conflicted and mediated relation with dominant cultural norms. Finally, we will examine how authors deploy imaginative, narrative, and linguistic strategies in literature to comment upon issues of diversity and social injustice. This course may include short stories, novels, poetry, autobiography,memoir, and drama. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    FR 2000 - FRENCH COLONIAL LEGACIES Course Description

    This course offers an inrtroduction to the historical and cultural diversity of various- primarily non-European-French-speaking regions of the world. It discusses French colonialism and its distinct and complex legacies in different areas of sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa, North America, Indo-China, the Caribbean, and France itself. Through historical, literary, and clultural readings and cinema, this course traces the effects of colonization on both the colonizer and the colonized, including its particular impact on women and children; thus grappling with issues of power and oppression, sexism, race and gender, enslavement and inequality, and justice and freedom. Taught in English.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2510 - MODERN WOMEN & GENDER Course Description

    A survey of women's and gender history in the modern era, the course draws comparisons between major world regions. Instructor may focus on one or more area of geographic expertise, exploring how societies have constructed gender and sexual identity; how race, ethnicity, class and other social differences have informed wormen's experiences over time; and how societies have developed systemic inequalities and forms of gender-based oppression. Special attention is given to the role of the state, the evolution of feminism. civil and human rights movements, and how individuals and collectives envision and work toward global feminism, sexual and reproductive liberation, and social justice.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2530 - AMERICAN SLAVERY Course Description

    This course examines the institution of American Slavery from the introduction of African slaves in North America to the Emancipation and aftermath of the American Civil War. It focuses on the political, economic, and social institutions supporting slavery as a system of racial and class oppression. Special attention is paid to the life and culture of the enslaved Blacks, patterns of resistance and rebellion, and gender dynamics of slavery. The course closes with an examination of the legacy of slavery as a sysem of oppression and surveys major strategies and movements that have sought to redress its impact on contemporary America.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2550 - HISTORY OF LATINOS/LATINAS Course Description

    From the mid - 19th century to the present, Latinos and Latinas have fought for equity and justice as members of society in the United States. However, the historical record shows that the heritage populations in annexed territories and immigrants from Latin America and their descendants have been excluded on the basis of race, class, and gender. This class will examine various historical interpretations of imperialism, immigration, gender and class bias, labeling, language, and citizenship as they apply to Latinos/Latinas. Utilizing a variety of primary and secondary sources, the class will develop a distinctly historical awareness of the legal, political, and human rights issues behind the Latino/Latina presence in the United States. The course will also examine several past and present Latino movements for social justice and their legacy for change in U.S. society.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2580 - ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Course Description

    An introduction to the histories of Americans of Asian ancestry from late eighteenth century to the recent past, this course focuses on the experiences of peoples from China, Japan, Korea, the Phillipines, Southeast Asia, and South Asia. It explores patterns and similarities in experience, while also addressing differences stemming from nationality, class, gender, and colonial and postcolonial relationships to the U.S.. Within a broad chronological framework, the course approaches the Asian American experience thematically. Topics will include: the impact of U.S. imperialism on Asian migration; the significance of Asian labor in the development of the American West; anti-Asian movements and exclusion; community formation and ethnic identity; stereotypical images of Asian Americans, from the Yellow Peril to the Model Minority; urban and suburban experiences; interaction with other ethnicities and social movements; and the forging of a pan-Asian movement in the 1960s.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2910 - HISTORY CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT Course Description

    An introduction to the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S. from 1955 to 1970. Drawing on interviews, speeches, autobiographies, film, and monographs, the course explores the Movements historical and ideological origins within the context of racial, gender and class inequality in the U.S. society. It discusses how African American men and women, along with whites and other peoples, fought against discriminatory legislation, policies, and practices. The course focuses on the evolution of the African American struggle for social justice and political equality and concludes with the Movements legacy and impact on American society and othe rmovements for social justice.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LAS 2020 - LATINOS & LATINAS IN THE US Course Description

    This course will analyze the historical and contemporary experiences of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. Latina/os in the U.S. are the largest minority group and constitute 16% of the nation’s total population. The course will use a gendered perspective to examine the social, economic, political and cultural conditions that have shaped the lives of Latinas and Latinos in U.S. history and society. It will explore the diversity of Latina/os in the United States, by drawing on the comparative histories of Chicanos and Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Central and South Americans to understand how different groups negotiate their presence in this country. Emphasis will be placed on broader issues such as Latina/o identity and its relationship to intersecting categories of class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and language.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 2550 - HISTORY OF LATINOS/LATINAS Course Description

    From the mid - 19th century to the present, Latinos and Latinas have fought for equity and justice as members of society in the United States. However, the historical record shows that the heritage populations in annexed territories and immigrants from Latin America and their descendants have been excluded on the basis of race, class, and gender. This class will examine various historical interpretations of imperialism, immigration, gender and class bias, labeling, language, and citizenship as they apply to Latinos/Latinas. Utilizing a variety of primary and secondary sources, the class will develop a distinctly historical awareness of the legal, political, and human rights issues behind the Latino/Latina presence in the United States. The course will also examine several past and present Latino movements for social justice and their legacy for change in U.S. society.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2130 - ROCK MUSIC DIVERSITY&JUSTICE Course Description

    This course is a chronological survey of the history of American Popular Music documenting the power relations in the music industry, both systematically and individually. Also included are the roles the different performers of the different genres of music play in protest and civil rights movements. This couse is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    NUR 3250 - CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS NUR Course Description

    This course will explore the ways in which culture, race, ethnicity, gender, class, religious beliefs, sexual orientation and ability are related to health and health outcomes in individuals and populations. The implications that racism, classism, sexism and other systems of oppression have on individual as well as population health will be considered. Factors related to health disparities and health care inequities among and between patient populations will be examined with consideration given to the role of the nurse in promoting health. Emphasis will be placed on the value of providing patient centered care to diverse patient populations.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 2950 - DISPARITIES IN HEALTH Course Description

    This course will explore the health disparities that exist among and between groups of people based on the categories of race, ethnicity,gender and class. Situated within the historical record of public health in the United States, this course will review the social, political, cultural, legal and ethical factors that influence health disparities. Significant attention will be given to the idea that health and access to health care is a basic human right in a just society.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 2190 - PHILOSOPHY OF JUSTICE Course Description

    What does it mean to be a just person, or to live in a just society? In what ways do we live up to this standard, and in what ways do we fall short? In this class, we will study traditional and contemporary theories of justice, and we will use these theories to analyze injustices that surround us in everyday life. Topics studied include human rights theory, utilitarianism, social contract theory, care ethics, diversity, distributive and criminal justice, inequality, oppression, racism, sexism, and heterosexism.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    POL 2720 - POLITICS & SEX Course Description

    What is it like to be female in a male-dominated society? This course critically examines the socio-political construction of patriarchy and the conscious and nonconscious, intentional and unintentional ways in which male supremacy is reproduced in contemporary society. Particular emphasis will be on the mechanisms of social control designed to limit women's participation in society and to ensure the perpetuation of male dominance. As the lens of the course is on the lived experiences of females, the intersections of racism, heterosexism, classism, and ableism will be addressed throughout the course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2410 - MINORITY GROUPS IN AMERICA Course Description

    This course examines, from a sociological perspective, the experiences of past and present minority groups in the U.S., as defined by race, ethnicity, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and disabiltiy. Particular emphasis is placed on the social construction of social minorities, recurring patterns in dominant-minority relations, group inclusion and exclusion, differential power, diversity and social justice, and group variations within the larger society. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2420 - MUSLIM & ISLAMIC US INST Course Description

    This course provides students with an understanding of the Muslim communities in the U. S. It will explore the bonds of Ummah (Muslim community) and the meaning of the Muslim American identity. Attention will be paid to the diversity of the American Muslim community and to the core of beliefs, values, practices and institutions that are integral to Muslim life in the U. S. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2990 - SOCIOLOGY OF RACE & LAW Course Description

    This course provides an overview of the relationship among race, racism and the law throughout the history of the United States. Students will learn about the social construction of race, racism within the US legal and immigration systems and the impact of racial discrimination on US society in areas including access to education, health care, housing, patterns of migration, and equal treatment in the criminal justice system. Attempts to overcome racial inequality, such as the Civil Rights Movement, subsequent racial justice such as the American Indian Movement and the Chicano Movement and the Affirmative Action Programs will also be discussed. The course will conclude with a discussion of the current racial hierarchy and the impact of the racial ideology of colorblindness on racial inequality. Course offered Spring Semester only.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 2020 - LATINOS & LATINAS IN THE US Course Description

    This course will analyze the historical and contemporary experiences of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. Latina/os in the U.S. are the largest minority group and constitute 16% of the nation’s total population. The course will use a gendered perspective to examine the social, economic, political and cultural conditions that have shaped the lives of Latinas and Latinos in U.S. history and society. It will explore the diversity of Latina/os in the United States, by drawing on the comparative histories of Chicanos and Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Dominicans, Cubans, and Central and South Americans to understand how different groups negotiate their presence in this country. Emphasis will be placed on broader issues such as Latina/o identity and its relationship to intersecting categories of class, race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and language.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 2250 - RACE, GENDER & SOC JUSTICE Course Description

    This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 2500 - RACISM & SEXISM GLOBAL PERSP Course Description

    This course examines present and historical forms of racism and sexism and other systems of oppression around the globe. The course will investigate global manifestations of racial privilege and changing configurations of whiteness with particular emphasis on the legacy of colonialism. It will also examine the diverse forms of patriarchy as well as its endurance. The connections between other forms of oppression, especially classism and heterosexism, will be explored.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 2570 - SEX, GENDER & SEXUALITY Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 2720 - POLITICS & SEX Course Description

    What is it like to be female in a male-dominated society? This course critically examines the socio-political construction of patriarchy and the conscious and nonconscious, intentional and unintentional ways in which male supremacy is reproduced in contemporary society. Particular emphasis will be on the mechanisms of social control designed to limit women's participation in society and to ensure the perpetuation of male dominance.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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  • Community and Civic Engagement - focusing on ideas and possibilities of community and participating effectively as responsible citizens. •One course (3 credits)


    UCC-5 Community&Civic Engag
    ANTH 3700 - ANTH SOCIAL MOVEMENTS Course Description

    This course provides students with a critical understanding of the key issues in the development of social movements and civic action from the perspective of anthropology. Anthropology’s unique on-the-ground and comparative perspective, and its emphasis on particularity and context will afford insights into issues of meaning at the center of social movements. Students will examine various models of public- and field-generated scholarship and apply this knowledge in a qualitative project that recognizes community members’ knowledge as key to social change in everyday life – where inequalities are experienced and often resisted. Examples of social movements appropriate for ethnographic research: Occupy, Tea Party, buy local, ACORN, immigrant rights, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ATEP 4750 - CLINICAL EXP IN AT V Course Description

    This class is a capstone course for senior, graduating students in the athletic training education program. In this course, students will summarize and draw together their didactic and clinical experience education in preparation for the athletic training Board of Certification examination. Students will explore subjects and current issues germane to the field of athletic training, complete clinical experience rotations with William Paterson University (WPU) athletic teams under the supervision of athletic training preceptors, perform clinical experience rotations under the supervision of various affiliated medical and allied health care professional preceptors, attend medical and allied health care related in-services, participate as a volunteer for community services activities related to athletic training, and observe orthopedic surgical procedures. This course will not only assist students to prepare for a profession in athletic training, but also to prepare them for an active role in community and civic engagement. Prerequisite: ATEP 4500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    COMM 2360 - FILM AND CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Course Description

    This course is designed to help expand students' understanding of social engagement and activism on local and global levels. The course will illustrate the vast capabilities of film medium in exploring social issues, raising consciouness, and encouraging viewers’ active engagement on behalf of social causes. Through weekly viewing and analysis of films dealing with a variety of pressing social issues, the course will attempt to enhance students’ awareness and inspire them to become active in their communities as agents of positive change. The course will focus on both social values and aesthetic aspects of the films.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4660 - CORP SOCIAL RESPONSIBILTY Course Description

    The course explores the concept(s) of corporate social responsibility (CSR), philanthropy and corporate strategy. Various real-world organizational CSR programs are analyzed to examine the scope and complexity of CSR and its impact on global and local business and society.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    EDUC 4140 - SR TEACHING/ INTERNSHIP Course Description

    The internship is a full-semester teaching experience in a field placement. It is designed to apply learning about professional knowledge, humanistic practices, and reflective thinking to classroom situations on a full-time basis for one semester. Students are observed a minimum of eight times by a University supervisor who regularly reviews student journals. A once a week, one hour and forty minute seminar accompanies the internship and has three goals: 1) discussion and reflection of current issues and students' teaching experiences, while brainstorming solutions to classroom problems; 2) creation of an e-portfolio; for K-5, students link artifacts to ten New Jersey Teaching Standards and are guided in writing reflective statements for each standard; for P-3, students link artifacts to the NAEYC teaching standards; the Seminar instructor provides evaluates and provides feedback on each portfolio using a rubric; and 3) career development information is also made available (e.g., resume writing, interviewing skills, organizing credential files).

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    EDUC 4150 - SENIOR TEACHNG INTERNSHP Course Description

    The internship is a 16 week teaching experience in a field placement. It is designed to apply learning about professional knowledge, humanistic practices and reflective thinking to classroom situations on a full-time basis for one semester. Students are observed a minimum of eight times by a University supervisor who regularly reviews student journals including lesson plans, reflective writing, and other documents. In conjunction with the field experience, students attend a weekly seminar that meets for the entire semester and has three primary goals: 1) discussion and reflection of current issues and students' teaching experiences, while brainstorming solutions to classroom problems 2)creation of a Professional Portfolio (an E-Portfolio - Live Text) which includes lesson plans, evaluations, philosophy of education, teaching artifacts linked to New Jersey Standards, and other documents. Students write reflective statements related to the standards 3) career development skills and documents are developed including preparation of a resume and cover letter, interviewing skills, credentials filed, etc. the seminar instructor provides feedback on each portfolio and assists students in developing appropriate materials.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    EDUC 4190 - SEN STUD TEACH INTERNSHIP K-12 Course Description

    The student Teaching Internship is a 16 week teaching experience in an urban or sub-urban school setting. The internship is designed to apply learning about professional knowledge, humanistic practices, community and civic engagement within education, and reflective thinking to classroom situations on a full-time basis for one semester. Students are observed a minimum of eight times by a university professor who regularly reviews student journals, lesson plans, and other work or writings related to the students growth as a future teacher. Student-teachers work in secondary classrooms with students who have varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds and exceptionalities. A seminar, CISE 4500: Reckoning with the Past and Preparing for a Future in Education, accompanies, and is an integral part of the internship. The seminar meets on a weekly basis throughout the semester for discussion and reflection of the students' teaching experiences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENV 4800 - SENIOR ENV PRACTICUM Course Description

    This is the capstone course in Environmental Science. In it, a group of senior students participate in a common project using methods and skills learned in the classroom. Depending on the project, these may include graphic and communications skills, data collection and evaluation, and field and laboratory techniques. Examples of projects include the compilation of a natural resource inventory for a neighboring community and the investigation of water quality in an urban stream. The instructor selects the subject of the study from student proposals, but each student's role on the team is jointly determined by both the student and the instructor. Students and instructor seek to simulate the working conditions of a professional consulting team engaged in a practical project. Regular work meetings are held during class time with a formal written and oral presentation at the end of the semester. This is a UCC Area 5 course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 3410 - GEOGRAPHY NORTH AMER CITIES Course Description

    This course examines North American cities and suburbs from a geography perspective. It is organized into three parts as follows. In the first part, students will be introduced to concepts and theories in urban geography. The second part examines major trends in the evolution and development of North American cities and the internal (spatial) structure and characteristics of these cities, including land use patterns, ecoomic activities, transportation, housing and social differentiation. The third part focuses on the demographic, economic, social, and environmental problems resulting from urban growth, and how urban policies and programs are formulated and implemented to address these problems.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2100 - U. S. LABOR HISTORY Course Description

    This course explores the experiences of North American workers from the nineteenth century to the present with a focus on how workers engaged with the problems they confronted and attempted to craft solutions. The course examines the everyday lives and challenges faced by workers at the job site, in their communities, and in their struggles to secure union representation and more favorable public policies. It traces the main outlines of the modern union movement, from the violent confrontations of the late nineteenth century, to the surge in union strength of the mid-twentieth century, to the dramatic membership declines of recent decades in an economy buffeted by globalization, deindustrialization, and downsizing. Special attention will be paid to the particular challenges confronting women, immigrant, and non white workers. The course will consider how particular groups of workers and their supporters engaged within their communities and with civic institutions to address a particular problem or set of challenges. Prerequisites: HIST 1010 or HIST 1020 or HIST 1030 or HIST 1040 or HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3510 - PUBLIC HISTORY Course Description

    This course introduces students to the non-teaching professional uses of history. Students will examine the theories, methods, varieties, and problems associated with what is called applied or public history. Because the history if every community is embedded in the life stories and experiences of its members, learning units will focus on the use of oral history in interpreting a community's past, enabling students to understand history from the bottom up.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 4200 - POLITICS & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS Course Description

    This senior-level History seminar focuses on politics and social movements in diverse societies during the Cold War. It begins with a historical survey of World War II to identify the roots of the Cold War and the emergence of the Three-World Order that came to characterize the post-1945 period. Thereafter, it examines critical social movements in the First, Second, and Third World during the Cold War with special emphasis on the 1960s and 1980s. The course integrates multi-disciplinary approaches and materials to analyze how the Cold War impacted social movements and how Cold War politics in turn were influenced by social movements. The course requires a research paper combining a variety of approaches and documentation pertaining to the history of social movements at the end of the Cold War, plus other ongoing formal writing assignments throughout the course. This course fulfills the UCC Writing Intensive and Area 5 Civic Engagement requirements. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 3290 - MIGRATION & DISP IN SPAN LIT Course Description

    This course explores migration and displacement theories as they apply to the narrative and film of Spanish migration. It studies the flow of peoples between Latin America and Spain and between African countries and Spain. Students will utilize theories learned int he course to identify and analyze specific case studies within their community dealing with problems such as displaced identities, language, legal and educational barriers, and anti-immigrant discourses. This is a Technology Intensive course. The course is taught fully in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LBST 2500 - LBST & COMM ENGAGEMENT Course Description

    In every society, individuals must struggle with balancing their own rights and freedoms with their responsibilities towards others. Liberal Studies and Community Engagement explores the ethical reasoning needed to bring individuals together into a community that allows connection and reciprocity while respecting individuals' autonomy. This course covers topics in social justice and applied ethics such as: responsible citizenship in local, national, and global societies, economic inequality, corporate responsibility, environmental justice, animal rights, reproductive rights, euthanasia, the death penalty, and diversity and equality. The course also discusses strategies for engaging with ethical issues in the community and requires civic engagement projects in which ethical theory is applied.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MGT 3600 - INNOV & SOCIAL ENTREPRENE Course Description

    This course focuses on how the next generation of visionaries will shape our society and create strategies for solving society’s problems through mission-driven enterprises. Students will learn how to define social good, assess market forces, recognize opportunities, and create innovative solutions that blur societal, government and business objectives, and engage stakeholders in local, national or global communities. Students will explore innovation and social entrepreneurship as purposeful disciplines that impact quality of life, social and environmental objectives, employment, wealth creation, sustainability, and ethics. Student teams will have opportunity to develop a concept plan focused on solving a societal problem of their choice. This course will be of benefit to all majors.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MUSI 4050 - MUSIC ENSEMBLE & THE COMMUNITY Course Description

    This course combines continued training for music performers in an ensemble (majors only) with academic and experiential exploration of the dynamics of civic and community engagement through service-learning. Students will prepare for the experience of the performance in the community by engaging in readings about music community outreach (current articles, case studies and other accounts) that connect their discipline with community service. As part of course requirements students will perform the same musical program with the same ensemble in two disparate socio-economic settings in the greater Northern New Jersey area, then engage in structured reflection about their experience. Students will become problem solvers by planning, designing, and implementing music performance in less advantaged areas.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MUSI 4400 - MUS MGMT INTERNSHIP Course Description

    The course provides students academic and experiential opportunities to demonstrate an integration of learned skills and allows for the application of knowledge gained in the music and entertainment management program coursework in real life situations within the community and its leaders, and experience how communities attempt to engage, persuade and problem solve.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    NUR 4290 - DIMENSIONS OF PUBLIC HEALTH Course Description

    The application of public health concepts provides the framework for this course. In conjunction with community partners, students conduct a community assessment collecting data from a variety of sources. Selected health indicators are discussed, as are goals, objectives and interventions to improve the health of populations. Principles of epidemiology are applied. Students observe and participate in health policy development and delivery of services at the community level. Prerequisite: NUR 4250

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 2550 - HEALTH CARE AND HEALTH POLICY Course Description

    This course is for non-majors. It provides an overview of health care in the United States. Who receives and who pays for health care are important issues that individuals, communities and ultimately, our society mst address. Access, cost, and financing are central themes of this course. Policy issues are examined with consideration of the roles played by government, consumers, advocates and other interest groups. Comparative health care models are used to debate ethical, political, economic and public helath issues.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PBHL 3140 - REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS Course Description

    This course explores the multifaceted and complex issues related to reproductive rights from an interdisciplinary perspective. The controversies surrounding reproductive technologies, pregnancy and childbirth, birth control, foster care, abortion, and adoption are explored with particular focus on public policy and its impact on the private lives of individual women.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 3150 - FOOD AND COMMUNITY Course Description

    This course is an exploration of the complex and challenging public health issues related to the globalization of our food supply. This course investigates the connections among the current food and food-animal production and distribution systems, food policy, and public health, with an emphasis on the growing movement toward sustainable, community-based systems of agriculture and the citizen’s role in this movement at local, state, national, and global levels. In this course students will integrate theory, practice, and problem-solving strategies in community settings, including community gardens, farmer’s markets, local family farms, food banks, civic organizations, and the larger systems in which these exist.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 3450 - HEALTH CARE & HEALTH POLICY Course Description

    This course is for non-majors. It provides an overview of health care in the United States. Who receives and who pays for health care are important issues that individuals, communities and ultimately, our society must address. Access, cost and financing are central themes of this course. Policy issues are examined with consideration of the roles played by government, consumers, advocates and other interest groups. Comparative health care miodels are used to debate thical, political,economic and public health issues.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PHIL 2400 - ETHICS & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Course Description

    This course considers specific issues in applied ethics such as: abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, and professional ethics; issues of diversity and equality in regard to race, gender, and economic status; and the extent of our moral obligations to the poor and starving of other countries, to animals, and to the environment. The course will enable students to evaluate their own beliefs about concrete ethical issues and to consider theoretical questions, such as: Where does morality come from? What makes an ethical argument good or bad? What general rules or principles ought we live by?

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 2200 - THE GLOBAL CITIZEN Course Description

    This course provides students core knowledge and skills for engaged citizenship in a global age. Students will examine community problems and civic life in the context of national and international events and agencies. They will explore traditional notions of citizenship, governance and policy-making while considering the global character of the political, economic and environmental challenges affecting local citizens the world over. Students will conduct applied research in the study of specific contemporary public policies determined by faculty expertise (i.e. human rights, the environment, the global south, war, immigration, sexual violence, education, poverty, etc.) and explore community/citizen efforts to influence policy outcomes. Additionally, students will develop a detailed policy brief outlining their own position and a civic-based political strategy plan to achieve policy goals in the context of decision-making processes.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 2270 - CIVIC ENGAGMT:THRY&PRAC Course Description

    This course provides students with academic and experiential opportunities to explore the political foundations of civic engagement, citizenship and community empowerment. To this end, students will explore political theories of democratic citizenship and civic engagement, participate in a meaningful community -based learning experience and engage in written reflection and analysis of their experience. As a requirement of this course, students will spend some time in a community-based organization or agency which will provide the context for the exploration of the course's central theme: civic participation and community engagement are the keys to a healthy democracy.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    POL 3606 - WOMEN & POL LEADERSHIP Course Description

    This course focuses on three major questions: Do women have an identifiably different way of leading? How does this leadership manifest itself? Why does women’s political leadership matter? This course analyzes debates about gender differences in political discourse, gendered construction of “politics,” historical struggles for women’s representation, different kinds of women’s political participation, and the barriers to political leadership faced by women. Case studies of women political leaders in different socio-political contexts, impacts of new social movements on policy development to ensure women’s representation across different societies will be the basis for developing a comparative perspective.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 3450 - COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY Course Description

    This course presents students with an introduction to the breadth of concepts, social issues, and research approaches that characterize community psychology. Unlike many other areas of Psychology,community psychology utilizes an ecological approach in examining adaptive and maladaptive behavior such that it may not be an issue with an individual but rather the fit of the individual with the context. Context here is viewed as multi-layered, behavior is examined as a function of the individual within networks of people, institutions, and social systems. Students will learn to recognize the complexity of the ecological perspective and the many circles of social influence with an eye to advancing the well-being of individuals and communities. In addition to examining theory-based research, this course will also focus on applied service delivery. The promotion of health, the prevention of mental health problems, and the design of community-level interventions will be addressed.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 3830 - SUBSTANCE ABUSE Course Description

    The abuse of alcohol and drugs has been a problem of human society for centuries. Every year, millions of Americans develop abusive or addictive use patterns leading to a range of personal and societal problems, which in turn result in enormous costs in the form of health problems, health care expenditures, loss of productivity, crime, threats to social welfare, and loss of life. This course provides a comprehensive overview of substance abuse, prevention theories, and program applications. The impact of substance abuse on society and communities (e.g., as a public health burden or a maintenance factor of other social problems) will be emphasized, along with community problem solving, decision-making, and other projects focused on civic engagement. Prerequisite: PSY 3510

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2220 - PUBLIC SOC & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Course Description

    This course provides students with an understanding of the current public sociology movement, the roots of public sociology in the origins of the discipline, and how public sociologists today are using the tools of sociology in civic engagement efforts. It includes an overview of the sociological perspectives and provides students with opportunities to utilize concepts, theories, and methodologies they learn in the course in civic engagement exercises. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 3290 - MIGRATION & DISP IN SPAN LIT Course Description

    This course explores migration and displacement theories as they apply to the narrative and film of Spanish migration. It studies the flow of peoples between Latin America and Spain and between African countries and Spain. Students will utilize theories learned int he course to identify and analyze specific case studies within their community dealing with problems such as displaced identities, language, legal and educational barriers, and anti-immigrant discourses. This is a Technology Intensive course. The course is taught fully in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 3140 - REPRO RIGHTS Course Description

    This course explores the multifaceted and complex issues related to reproductive rights from an interdisciplinary perspective. The controversies surrounding reproductive technologies, pregnancy and childbirth, birth control, foster care, abortion, and adoption will be explored with particular focus on public policy and its impact on the private lives of individual women.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 3330 - ACTIVISM & SOCIAL CHANGE Course Description

    This course critically examines the notion and practices of “activism” that are framed around contemporary issues that call for “social change” such as inequality, violence, loss of livelihoods, educational access, forced migration, lack of health and healthcare, environmental justice, discrimination and law, and globalization. Using a social justice framework to explore dynamics of race, gender and class, the course will examine case studies of community activism and advocacy to understand the interconnected systems of inequality and ways to challenge them. Key questions that inform this course are: What are the social, political, economic, ecological and cultural conditions that give rise to social activism and movements? How have marginalized groups historically organized for political and social justice? How do these movements affect political processes and institutions? The course will explore possibilities to engage with local community-based work and advocacy.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 3606 - WOMEN & POL LEADERSHIP Course Description

    This course focuses on three major questions: Do women have an identifiably different way of leading? How does this leadership manifest itself? Why does women’s political leadership matter? This course analyzes debates about gender differences in political discourse, gendered construction of “politics,” historical struggles for women’s representation, different kinds of women’s political participation, and the barriers to political leadership faced by women. Case studies of women political leaders in different socio-political contexts, impacts of new social movements on policy development to ensure women’s representation across different societies will be the basis for developing a comparative perspective.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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  • Global Awareness - focusing on local, regional and global connectivities, possibilities and limits. •One course (3 credits)


    UCC-6 Global Awareness
    ANTH 2030 - EXPLORING ASIA Course Description

    This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the geography, history, culture, society, economics, and politics of India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The foundation for the Asian Studies program, this course is taken at the beginning of the course of study. This course is taught collectively by participating Asian Studies faculty members.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 3100 - GLOBAL TRANS & HUMAN CONDITION Course Description

    This course develops an understanding of the experiences of “globalization” as a historical phase of capitalism, and “development” as a post-World War II set of practices. It will analyze specific “global” problems as manifested in the lives of large sections of the world’s poor and marginalized populations across multiple societies. These problems include: poverty and inequality; livelihoods and food security; endemic hunger, malnutrition and healthcare systems; overconsumption, population and environmental degradation; international debt; displacement and migration; intellectual property rights and indigenous knowledge; wars and cultural conflicts. Emphasis will be on contradictory impacts on people and societal prospects in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and on marginalized populations in advanced capitalist countries. Methods to facilitate a just and sustainable future for humanity will also be explored. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTH 2330 - ARTS OF AFRICA Course Description

    This course examines the arts of Western and sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. as we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery's Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTH 2800 - ASIAN ART Course Description

    This course presents a general survey of major art forms developed in Eastern, Southern, and Southeastern Asia from the Neolithic period to the early 20th century It will examine ceramics, bronzes, jade, architecture, scupture, painting, woodblock printing, and garden designing, etc. With chronological format, attention will be given to some ineresting points in style, iconography, symbolism, religion, philosophy, aesthetics and history

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 2840 - ART OF PRECOLOMBIAN AMERICAS Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the arts of ancient american Indians in North, central and South America from the formative period to the conquest of Europeans. Several major cultures will be examined: tje Northwest Cpast, the Southeast, and the Southwest in North America; Olmec, Teotihuacan, MonteAalban, Maya and Aztec in Mesoamerica; and Chavin, Paracas-Nazca, Moche, chimu, and Inca in the South America. The focus will be on the significance of the art and the cultures where certain art forms were applied. the stylistic characeristics of the forms, and the philosophical/religious ideas involved will be emphasized.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 2860 - MODERN ART OF LAT AMER Course Description

    A study of the major movements and individuals in painting and sculpture in Latin America during the Modern period (1920s - 1960s).

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 3330 - SILK ROAD ART Course Description

    This course presents a survey of several art traditions on the ancient Silk Road from 1200 BC to the early 20th century. while the course will cover some of the West and Far East, its focus will be in Central Asia, looking at the impact of Alexander in Central Asia, the Hart Dynasty's expansion i n the West Region, the Tang Dynastry's diplomatic relationship with foreign countries, the Persians, Genghis Khan and the Mongols, and Islamic Central Asia. These issues will be examined through the lens of the visual arts, including works in bronze/metal, ceramics, silk/textile designs, mural paintings, and sculpture. The exchange of ideas and art styles/techniques will be emphasized. Through the art produced along the Silk Road, we will witness the beginnings of globalization, looking at how East and West interacted, and how they stimulated and influenced eaach other.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 3380 - ISLAMIC ART&ARCHITECTURE Course Description

    This course presents the arts of Muslim cultures from the beginnings of Islam in the early seventh century to the modern period. Students examine architectural monuments from palaces to mosques as well as small-scale “luxury” items like textiles, metalwork, ceramics, and illuminated manuscripts. Lectures and discussions explore the diversity of Islamic art throughout the world, observing its role in the Middle East, Asia, and North Africa as well as its influence on the West. We will also connect the history of Islamic art with the contemporary world through discussions and a visit to the Brooklyn Museum of Art, which currently houses the most extensive collection of Islamic arts on view in the New York metropolitan area. This is a Writing Intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 2000 - CHIN CULTURE GLOBAL CONTEXT Course Description

    This course introduces essential elements of Chinese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Chinese have identified their disctinctive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked China to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 2010 - EXPLORING ASIA:INTRO ASIAN STD Course Description

    This multi-disciplinary course introduces students to the geography, history, culture, society, economics, and politics of India, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The foundation for the Asian Studies program, the course is taken at the beginning of the course of study. This course is taught collectively by participating Asian Studies faculty members. (Portal to Asian Studies major and minor)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 2020 - BUDDHISM TAOISM & E ASN CUL Course Description

    The course introduces students to key concepts of Buddhism, especially Zen Buddhism, and Taoism, and focus on their interaction with and contributions to East Asian culture. We will explore how Buddhist and Taoist concepts, experience, and practices have informed distinctive aspects of East Asian culture: fiction, poetry, painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, gardening, tea ceremony, martial arts, diet, traditionall medicine, and everyday life. Furthermore, Buddhism and Taoism will be examined as an interconnecting theme that links various Asian cultures, and also connects the East and the West.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 2060 - JAPANESE CULTR GLOBAL CTX Course Description

    This course introduces essential elements of Japanese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Japanese have identified their distictive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked Japan to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 2270 - EASTERN PHIL & RELIGION Course Description

    A comparative study of the principal past and present Eastern religions and of religious feelings and experience.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 2700 - EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATION Course Description

    This course is a survey of East Asian civilization from its formative age to the present. The course focuses on the cultural heritage of Easy Asia, including Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and the diverse paths taken by three East Asian societies, China, Japan, and Korea, in their efforts to build modern nations. Special attention is given to interaction between the three societies that gave rise to a strong cultural bond in East Asia. (Portal to East Asia track)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 2800 - CIVILIZATIONS OF SOUTH ASIA Course Description

    A thematic introduction to the continuities and variations in the cultural history of the Indian subcontinent that examines the concept of civilization, including ideas of the past, forms of authority and resistance, the interaction of relgious traditions, the colonial encounter, and the rise of competing nationalisms. (Portal to South Asia track)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3020 - JAPANESE LIT&FILM IN TRANSL Course Description

    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies— ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the "new classics" on celluloid and animé—the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today's world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 3060 - CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. We discuss popular belief systems, popular religions and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. We also look at contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, film, television, and music. These subjects are studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English. (Cross-listed: CHIN 3020)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3200 - CNTMPRY KOREAN CUL IN GLBL ERA Course Description

    The course examines the contemporary culture of South Korea. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course examines factors affecting its economic prosperity and analyzes contemporary Korean ways of life, attitudes and behavior in a wide variety of cultural domains such as TV dramas, films, music, arts, sports and food. The course probes how contemporary Korean culture has become popular in many parts of the world (a phenomenon known as the Korean Wave or hallyu), and investigates how it perceived by Koreans and non-Koreans. (No knowledge of Korean language or culture is presumed.)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3250 - WOMEN IN MOD JAPANESE LIT Course Description

    This course iexamines the portrayal of women, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Japanese literature. The course examines modern Japanese society and culture and interplay between tradition and modernity through the prism of canonical and contemporary literature. Topics include notions of the self, national and gender identity, and the impact of Westernization, modernization, urbanization, industrialization, and globalization. All readings will be in English. (Cross-listed: JPAN 3250, WS 3260, ENG 3280)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3410 - ASN & AMER CROSS CULT COMM Course Description

    A comparative and contrastive study of interpersonal communication in East Asia (i.e. China, Japan, and Korea) and the United States. The course familiarizes students with the foundations of cross-cultural pragmatics, and examines the differences and similarities in cognitive, verbal, and behavioral patterns among East Asians and between East Asians and Americans.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 3610 - MODERN JAPAN Course Description

    This course examines Japan’s spectacular rise to world power and a position of economic prominence and significance in today’s global society. The social, economic, cultural and political consequences of industrialization and “Westernization” receive special attention since they link Japan to similar processes in play in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the past two centuries. Japan’s experience with continental empire, war, defeat, and recovery will be treated from many perspectives, including the role played by memory in shaping Japan's international posture in the postwar era. Literature, cultural artifacts, and films will be key resources used to explore the worldviews of Japanese people and the popularized images of Japanese culture in other regions of the world including America.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3620 - MAKING JAPAN POP CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in cultural transformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of "globalization." We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre, cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite: One 1000-level course in History.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 3640 - JAPANESE HIST THROUGH CINEMA Course Description

    Japan has had one of the world's strongest and most creative cinema traditions, dating back practically to the invention of motion pictures. It has produced some of the greatest directors, actors, and themes in cinema history and its influence in contemporary culture outside of Japan, especially through its anime off-shoots, are now standard fare worldwide. This course examines what Japanese cinema can teach us about the making of contemporary Japan. It is dedicated to a special theme that engages the class in an historical quest to show how we can better understand the making of modern Japan through the history of its cinema. (Cross-listed: HIST 3640)

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 3910 - POPULATION&DEVELOPMNT IN ASIA Course Description

    This course introduces students to an overview of (1) the population growth and population problems in major Asian countries, such as China and India; (2) the relationship between population and socioeconomic development; and (3) the relationship between Asian development and the world (Non-Western course).

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    AWS 2010 - AFRICAN CIVILIZATIONS Course Description

    This is a survey of African civilizations from earliest times to the end of the 19th century. The course focuses on the socio-economic, political and cultural heritages of African peoples in the lower Nile Valley, the highlands of Ethiopia, the savanna grasslands and forest regions of West Africa, the central African Plateau, and the East African coast. Special attention is given to the interaction of these civilizations with other parts of the world to the end of the nineteenth century.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    AWS 2330 - ARTS OF AFRICA Course Description

    This course examines the arts of Western and Sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. As we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery’s Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    AWS 3020 - E AFRICA & INDIAN OCEAN WORLD Course Description

    This course explores the integration of Eastern Africa in the Indian Ocean World (IOW). We shall trace the emergence of an IOW through the development of oceanic trade relations as far back as the ancient civilizations of the Ancient Middle East and Indus Valley. We shall then consider the connection of Eastern Africa to this world based on the “discovery” of the regime of monsoon winds that governed sailing in the Indian Ocean; the rise and expansion of Islam throughout the IOW; the various migrations, diasporas, and networks that connect different peoples and places; and the different responses of the peoples of the IOW to European imperialism, from the Portuguese to the British. By looking at the history of Eastern Africa as part of the IOW, we will also be questioning the notion of globalization as a modern phenomenon.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    AWS 3380 - AFRICAN POLITICS Course Description

    Deals with post-independence governmental political parties and ideological inclinations among African states. Emphasis is on the origin and evolution of political institutions and their function within contemporary Africa.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHIN 2000 - CHIN CULTURE GLOBAL CONTEXT Course Description

    This course introduces essential elements of Chinese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Chinese have identified their disctinctive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked China to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CHIN 2020 - BUDDHISM TAOISM & E ASN CUL Course Description

    The course introduces students to key concepts of Buddhism, especially Zen Buddhism, and Taoism, and focus on their interaction with and contributions to East Asian culture. We will explore how Buddhist and Taoist concepts, experience, and practices have informed distinctive aspects of East Asian culture: fiction, poetry, painting, calligraphy, sculpture, architecture, gardening, tea ceremony, martial arts, diet, traditionall medicine, and everyday life. Furthermore, Buddhism and Taoism will be examined as an interconnecting theme that links various Asian cultures, and also connects the East and the West.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHIN 3020 - CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE Course Description

    Examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. Deals with popular belief systems, popular religions, and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. Also considers contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, flim, television, and music. These subjects are studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2350 - FILM AS CROSS -CULT COMM Course Description

    This course is designed to help us study how films explore cultures. Films have proven their tremendous potential as viable means of providing exposure and insights into the vast, mostly uncharted realms of cross-cultural communication. Although the technological revolution has reduced the physical boundaries of our world to those of a "village," the social and cultural differences have persisted and managed to keep us as far apart as ever. We notice each other's presence, but fail to understand one another through weekly viewing and analyzing of films, this course attempts to open a window through which we could see a more critical view of ourselves and a more receptive view of the others. The course will focus on both cultural values and aesthetic aspects of the film.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 3400 - INTERCULTURAL COMM Course Description

    Through a comparison of numerous cultures, students explore the primary distinguishing characteristics of culture and identify strategies for relating their own culture to those of others. Emphasis is placed on an eclectic cultural design. The primary goal is to provide students with practical and theoretical knowledge and an understanding of intercultural communication in contemporary life situations.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 3410 - ASN & AMER CROSS CULT COMM Course Description

    A comparative and contrastive study of interpersonal communication in East Asia (i.e. China, Japan, and Korea) and the United States. The course familiarizes students with the foundations of cross-cultural pragmatics, and examines the differences and similarities in cognitive, verbal, and behavioral patterns among East Asians and between East Asians and Americans.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ECON 3600 - ECON GROWTH & DEV Course Description

    The course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts, issues and sources of economic and social growth and development in developing countries. Particular emphaisis will be placed on the functioning of developing countries' in Africa, Asia and the Middle East versus the developed countries' economies in Europe and the United States, their interactions and on the appropriate policies to promote developement at both domestic and global levels.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ECON 3700 - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Course Description

    This course examines the trends, theories, and policies of trade using a global perspective. Emphasis will be on the relationship between disparities and differences among cultures and their impact on trade. In particular, the course uses a comparative perspective to analyze principle concepts and theories of trade, trade policies, and the interactions between trade, culture, and the environment. Prerequisites: ECON 2010 AND ECON 2020

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 3540 - READINGS IN GLOBAL LIT Course Description

    This course introduces students to representative texts in literatures from across the world, focusing especially on literatures from the global south/ non-western world, which may range from the ancient to the modern and contemporary periods. The course emphasizes a broadly comparative perspective which situates literary texts, either Anglophone or in translation, from different regions, both in specific cultural and political contexts, as well as studies them in depth from a boadly literary perspective in conversation and canonical western literary texts and genres.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    FIN 4000 - INTERN'L FINANCIAL MGMT Course Description

    Financial management of a multinational enterprise. Topics include foreign exchange risk, political risk, long-run investment and financing decisions, working capital management, and valuation of operations and taxation. Also, investigation of the local and global interactions of multinational corporations with diverse cultures and societies. Prerequisite: FIN 3200

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 2100 - HUMAN GEOGRAPHY Course Description

    The course explores the basic principles of human geography. Major topics to be covered include population, language, economics, urbanization, industrialization, globalization, and the environment.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 2200 - GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT & HUMANS Course Description

    This course is concerned with the way we interact with the world around us; the causes, consequences, and potential solutions to environmental problems we create. The course will also introduce students to major theories in human and environmental geography, and offer basic explanations for local, national, and global variation in human geographic aspects such as population, agriculture, biodiversity, resources (water, minerals, forests), atmospheric composition, global climate change, energy and waste management.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 3200 - CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY Course Description

    Cultural geography is a subfield within human geography that deals with the study of cultural products and norms and their variations across and relations to spaces, places and regions. It looks at the characteristics of people in a location with respect to their language, religion, ethnicity, architecture, foods, clothing, and how these affect the environment. The course will discuss the nature and spatial distribution of major cultural features including population, migration, language, religion, ethnicity and political systems utlizing examples from Africa, Asia and Latin America. The problems resulting from the depletion, destruction, and inefficient use of resources such as energy, water, air, mineral, forests and soils in developing countires will also be addressed.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 3210 - GEO OF THE GLOBAL ECONOMY Course Description

    Economic geography is a subfield of geography concerned with the spatial organization and distribution of economic activities, the use of the world's resources, and the geographic structure and expansion of the world economy. The first part of the course will introduce students to major theories in economic geography. The second part will offer explanations for local, national, and regional variations in economic activites, resource utilization, economic growth and decline, wealth and poverty, and economic development problems.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 3320 - GEOGRAPHY OF MIDDLE EAST Course Description

    This course focuses on a geographical analysis of the Middle East. It examines the natural (physical environment) and human ( cultural, social, economic,and political) factors that have shaped and continue to shape the region's geography, and have helped to define it as a distinct region. This course also examines the region's relationship with other world regions in an increasingly globalized world. Topics to be examined include the physcal environment, natural resources, environmental issues, population, settlement patterns, urban development, language, religion, and ethnicity, economic development, and geopolitical issues.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 3340 - GEO OF AFRICA IN GLOBAL PERSP Course Description

    This course deals with aspects of human and physical geography of Africa. It is organized into four parts as follows: The first part will give an overview of the physical-environmental geography of Africa including analysis of the impacts of human activities on forest degradation and desertification. The second part examines the socio-cultural geography of Africa within the context of the region's pre-colonial and colonial history, its diverse political systems, and cultures. The third part discusses the multidimensional and interconnected nature of the development process in Africa by examining the broad aspects of development including transportation, the urban sector, agriculture and industry. The fourth part evaluates Africa's prospects in a new global economy.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 3350 - GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMER Course Description

    This course focuses on a geographical analysis of Latin America as a major world region.It examines the physical, environmental, and human (social, cultural, economic, demographic and political)factors that have shaped and continue to shape the region's geography, and define its distinctiveness from other regions of the world. It also explores the nature, dyanamics, and dimensions of the social, economic, demographic, and political interactions between Latin America and other world regions (North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, etc)in the context of an increasingly globalized world, and the implications of these relationships for the geography of the region.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 2090 - PIRACY IN THE EARLY MOD WORLD Course Description

    A history of high seas piracy from the European “discovery” of the Americas to 1750. The course studies piracy as it linked the Americas, Europe, and the Early Modern world’s most important trading empires,China and India. The course considers mercantilist policies and the role of privateers, buccaneers, and pirates in the context of political and economic rivalries, and in the transfer of New World riches from the colonies to world markets. It surveys the ways maritime predatory practices evolved and shaped the emerging colonial societies. It explores the ships, weapons, and tactics as well as the everyday life and power relations in the multi-national, multi-racial societies created on pirate ships and in coastal communities. The course compares the “golden age piracy” to other instances of maritime piracy,including contemporary forms. Prerequisite: One 1000 level History course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2700 - EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATION Course Description

    This course is a survey of East Asian civilization from its formative age to the present. The course focuses on the cultural heritage of Easy Asia, including Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism, and the diverse paths taken by three East Asian societies, China, Japan, and Korea, in their efforts to build modern nations. Special attention is given to interaction between the three societies that gave rise to a strong cultural bond in East Asia.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2800 - CIVILIZATIONS OF SOUTH ASIA Course Description

    An introduction to the continuities and variations in the cultural history of the Indian subcontinent that will examine the concept of civilization, including ideas of the past, forms of authority and resistance, the interaction of religious traditions, the colonial encounter, and the rise of competing natiionalisms and their impact on the South Asian region.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3300 - RUSSIAN EMPIRE Course Description

    Examines society, politics, and culture of Imperial Russia from the reign of Peter the Great to the last Romanovs. Major topics include serfdom, intellectual currents, and nineteenth-century revolutionary movements.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3610 - MODERN JAPAN Course Description

    This course examines Japan’s spectacular rise to world power and a position of economic prominence and significance in today’s global society. The social, economic, cultural and political consequences of industrialization and “Westernization” receive special attention since they link Japan to similar processes in play in Asia, Europe, and the Americas over the past two centuries. Japan’s experience with continental empire, war, defeat, and recovery will be treated from many perspectives, including the role played by memory in shaping Japan's international posture in the postwar era. Literature, cultural artifacts, and films will be key resources used to explore the worldviews of Japanese people and the popularized images of Japanese culture in other regions of the world including America.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3620 - MAKING JAPAN POP CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in culturaltransformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of "globalization." We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre,cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite: One 1000-level History course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3640 - JAPANESE HIST THROUGH CINEMA Course Description

    Japan's cinema tradition is one of the world's strongest, including many of the best directors, actors, and themes in cinema history. The course examines what Japanese motion pictures can teach us about the making of Japan itself. Samurai, geisha, Emperor's soldiers, yakuza, "military comfort women," Godzilla, and the cinema of the everyday and tomorrow's "Akira" and "Neo-Tokyo" will be examined through the use of films as historical documents and guides as to how the Japanese have grappled with Japanese tradition and the changing contemporary world.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3810 - MODERN LATIN AMERICA Course Description

    Such topics as problems of early nationhood; caudillismo versus modern dictatorships and quest for democracy; difficulties in moving from a colonial to a national economy; and the social tensions of a society in transition are explored with consideration given to Latin America's role in world affairs and relationships with the United States.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3900 - EARLY ISLAMIC HISTORY & CIVIL Course Description

    History of Islamic civilization from the Prophet Muhammad to the Mongol Invasion and destruction of the Classical Caliphate in A.D. 1258. The subjects of concentration are (1) the expansion of Islam as a political movement, (2) the formulation of the prophetic message into the religion and law that became the spiritual nucleus of the new civilization, (3) the absorption of the subject peoples (Jews, Christians, Iranians, Turks, Berbers) into the civilization and the role they played in its development and broadening visions and (4) the intellectual achievements of the High Caliphate in law, theology, mysticism, science, philosophy.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3920 - CONTEMPORARY MIDDLE EAST Course Description

    This course is a survey of Middle Eastern history from World War II to the present, with an emphasis on political, social, and economic development, nationalism and militarism, and contemporary problems threatening the uneasy peace in the region.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    JPAN 2060 - JAPANESE CULTR GLOBAL CTX Course Description

    This course introduces essential elements of Japanese culture and explores its evolution and change from a global perspective. It discusses topics and concepts through which Japanese have identified their distictive cultural heritage, as well as global issues, ideas, and developments that linked Japan to other societies in Asia and the rest of the world.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    JPAN 3020 - JAPANESE LIT&FILM IN TRANSL Course Description

    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies— ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the "new classics" on celluloid and animé—the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today's world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    JPAN 3250 - WOMEN IN MOD JAPANESE LIT Course Description

    This course examines the portrayal of women, gender, and sexuality in contemporary Japanese literature. The course examines modern Japanese society and culture and the interplay between tradition and modernity through the prism of canonical and contemporary literature. Topics include notions of the self, national and gender identity, and the impact of Westernization, modernization, urbanization, industrialization, and globalization. In English.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    KORE 3200 - CNTMPRY KOREAN CUL IN GLBL ERA Course Description

    The course examines the contemporary culture of South Korea. Interdisciplinary in nature, the course examines factors affecting its economic prosperity and analyzes contemporary Korean ways of life, attitudes and behavior in a wide variety of cultural domains such as TV dramas, films, music, arts, sports and food. The course probes how contemporary Korean culture has become popular in many parts of the world (a phenomenon known as the Korean Wave or hallyu), and investigates how it perceived by Koreans and non-Koreans. (No knowledge of Korean language or culture is presumed.)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LANG 3100 - ROMANCE LANG IN DIASPORA Course Description

    This course examines how cultural, historical, and political dynamics resulted in the exportation of Romance languages to Africa, the Caribbean, the Americas and Asia. Within the contexts of colonization and slavery, these dynamics also led to the development of new languages, Romance creoles, around the world. Linguistic tools of analysis will be employed to compare and contrast features of the European and non-European Romance varieties, including Romance creoles.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 2010 - INTRO TO LATIN AM STUDIES Course Description

    This course introduces students to the literature, geography, history, culture, society, economics, and political systems of Latin America. It focuses not only on Latin America as a whole, but also on the relationships between the various geographical regions--Mexico, Central America, Caribbean, and South America--that constitute it. This is the foundation course for the Latin American Studies major and minor. Students are advised to take this course, which is offered every semester, at the beginning of the major or minor.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LAS 2320 - SURVEY OF LAT AM LIT Course Description

    This course is a comprehensive exploration of Latin American and Caribbean literature from the fifteenth century to the present. The focus is on major writers and literary trends. Students will be introduced to Latin American poetry, narrative, theater, short stories and essays; to the contributions and tendencies of different regions and countries; to the history of the Latin American literary landscape in the context of global interactions; and to forms of dialogue between Latin America literary production and other forms of representing and questioning the world. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2110

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LAS 2860 - ART OF LATIN AMERICA Course Description

    A study of the major movements and individuals in painting and sculpture in Latin America during the Modern period (1920s - 1960s).

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 3340 - GEOGRAPHY OF LATIN AMERICA Course Description

    This course focuses on a geographical analysis of Latin America as a major world region.It examines the physical, environmental, and human (social, cultural, economic, demographic and political)factors that have shaped and continue to shape the region's geography, and define its distinctiveness from other regions of the world. It also explores the nature, dyanamics, and dimensions of the social, economic, demographic, and political interactions between Latin America and other world regions (North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, etc)in the context of an increasingly globalized world, and the implications of these relationships for the geography of the region.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 3810 - MODERN LATIN AMERICA Course Description

    Such topics as problems of early nationhood; caudillismo versus modern dictatorships and quest for democracy; difficulties in moving from a colonial to a national economy; and the social tensions of a society in transition are explored with consideration given to Latin America's role in world affairs and relationships with the United States.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MGT 3090 - INTERNATIONAL MGMT Course Description

    Provides a framework for the analysis of international management problems. Defines the nature of the international, multi-national, and transnational company. Also examines the evolution of these types of enterprises, develops a model of a multinational firm in a dynamic global setting, and provides a bridge among the disciplines of economics, sociology, political science, and international management. Prerequisite: MGT 2000

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2140 - INDIAN MUSIC Course Description

    In Indian Music students will focus on classical, pop, and folk music from the Indian subcontinent, as wellas hybrid music that blends Indian music and jazz and Western classical music. We will also look at Indian music as part of the Indian diaspora, and how its interaction with other cultures has changed its essense and presentation. The class is designed as a lecture course, with various listening and group participation exercises. Students will become proficient in the basic music terminology of both North Indian Hindustani music and South Indian Carnatic music, and will learn to play and sing some simple compositions.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2160 - WORLD MUSIC Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the discipline of ethnomusicology through readings of and listenings to selected music from locations such as Africa, Indonesia, the Islamic World, India, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Attention will be focused on traditional and classical musics but varoius popular music that cmbines aspects of Western popular sounds with non-Western traditional cultures will also receive attention. Emphasis will be on analytical questions ( how is music put together?), but social questions (what role does music serve?/how is the music conceived by the people who make it and its primary audience?) will also be included.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 3110 - GLOBAL HEALTH ISSUES Course Description

    This course presents an overview of global health issues through examination of major determinants of health and key areas of disease burden. Students will be introduced to the complex tapestry of social, economic, political and environmental factors that affect the health of populations globally. Students will examine global health interventions to understand features of successful programs. Working in small groups, students will use their knowledge to design a solution to a real world health challenge facing a developing country.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 2270 - EASTERN PHIL & RELIGION Course Description

    A comparative study of the principal past and present Eastern religions and of man's religious feelings and experience.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 3280 - GLOBAL ENERGY SCI & TECH Course Description

    Intended for non-science majors, this course provides an introduction to the physical and technological principles behind various forms of energy production as well as its use and local/global environmental consequences. Topics include work, energy and power, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, electricity generation, fossil fuels, nuclear power, alternative/renewable energy sources and environmental risks/benefits. The course also examines cultural/societal differences in energy requirements, production and use across the globe. This is a descriptive non-laboratory course without the use of extensive mathematics.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 2300 - COMPARATIVE POLITICS Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the sub-discipline of comparative politics. It emphasizes critical analysis of the principal approaches and models currently employed by political science in an attempt to understand the process of political change and the variegated political systems of the world. Students will analyze other political systems and processes besides the US. The course will explore and impart knowledge about the real world politics of a range of countries in Europe, South America, Asia and Africa.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 2400 - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Course Description

    This course will study the nation-state system, the global struggle for power, the evolution of the international system and the basic influences that shape foreign policy of states. It will examine the role of ideologies and domestic politics as these affect foreign policy behavior. It will also seek to explain the emerging importance of non-state actors and the ways in which they shape international security and diplomatic environment. This course will familiarize students with the functions and power of international bodies such as the United Nations, International Court of Criminal Justice, the World Bank and the IMF.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 3360 - POLITICS OF ASIA: Course Description

    Asia includes the world's two most populous countries and some of its most dynamic economies. This course examines the politics of Asia, within a comparative perspective. Divergent colonial legacies, ideologies, and cultural traditions will be examined. The course will focus on Asia’s post-Cold War developments, particularly the challenge posed by the emergence of India and China and their role in shaping international discourse on democracy, development, global finance, climate change, environment, security, international law and human rights.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    POL 3370 - POL OF LATIN AMER Course Description

    This course is an introduction to the politics of Latin America. It is framed around the region’s struggle for political order and economic development. The first part of the course focuses on the socio-economic and institutional explanations of order and growth. The second part analyzes the region’s experience with democracy, and the challenges that Latin American regimes face with this form of government. Finally, the course looks at the politics and democratic challenges of several specific countries in the region, such as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Mexico, and Venezuela.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 3390 - AFRICAN POLITICS Course Description

    The course deals with the origin and evolution of political institutions and their functions in contemporary Africa. The course will focus on the following broad themes: the history and legacy of imperial and colonial domination, the nature of the post-colonial state and governance, the issue of democracy and development, the condition and contributions of African women, the politics of the post cold war, and Africa in the global economy.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 3430 - THE UNITED NATIONS Course Description

    A study of the leading international organization in the world today and its role in maintaining security, peacekeeping, economic and social development and human rights. The perspectives of nations from different regional blocs will be examined.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    POL 3470 - MIDDLE EAST IN WORLD POL Course Description

    The Middle East -- that region stretching from North Africa to Southwest Asia -- is of tremendous importance in international relations, containing as it does immense oil resources, strategic waterways, colonial legacies, and contending nationalist movements. This course examines both the role of outside powers and local actors in this volatile region.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PSY 3650 - CROSS CULTURAL PSYCH Course Description

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the role of culture in shaping a person’s developmental processes, emotion, identity, social behavior and mental health. Findings of relevant classic and contemporary cross-cultural empirical studies will be presented, with emphasis on the universal and culturally-specific aspects of human condition. In addition, this course will explore ways to integrate cultural perspectives into understanding and working with people around the globe.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    RPS 3000 - GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES IN SALES Course Description

    This course incorporates an analysis of the sales function across national borders. The impact of strategic, economic, political, legal, and cultural factors on sales activities, factors that influence the globalization of selling, and the impact of cultural differences on global selling and buying will be discussed. Prerequisite: RPS 2050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 3760 - SOC GLOBALIZATION & INEQUALITY Course Description

    The course examines different perspectives and issues in contemporary global sociology. Particular attention is given to non-Western sociological views and perspectives. A number of social inequality issues are analyzed within a global context to examine the international dimension of issues in contemprary society. In addition, students gain an understanding of conducting and implementing research on international development issues (non-Western course). Course offered Spring Semester only.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SOC 3910 - POPULATION & DEVLPMNT IN ASIA Course Description

    This course introduces students to an overview of (1) the population growth and population problems in major Asian countries, such as China and India; (2) the relationship between population and socioeconomic development; and (3) the relationship between Asian development and the world (Non-Western course). Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 2320 - SURV LAT AM LIT Course Description

    This course is a comprehensive exploration of Latin American and Caribbean literature from the fifteenth century to the present. The focus is on major writers and literary trends. Students will be introduced to Latin American poetry, narrative, theater, short stories and essays; to the contributions and tendencies of different regions and countries; to the history of the Latin American literary landscape in the context of global interactions; and to forms of dialogue between Latin America literary production and other forms of representing and questioning the world. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2110

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 3080 - HUMAN TRAFFICKING Course Description

    This course will examine the disparate socio-cultural, economic and political factors that affect international migration and human trafficking throughout the world. It will use a feminist/gendered perspective to analyze changes in the global economy that impact transnational migration, domestic labor, global sex work, sexual violence and militarism, and sex tourism. particular attention will be paid to the debates and policies that have shaped the above topics.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 3600 - GENDER & GLOBALIZATION Course Description

    Over the last half century, the economic, political and the cultural dimensions of globalization has fundamentally transformed the lived experience of work and labor, families, governance and welfare, community and nation. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to interrogate the contemporary process of globalization as it impacts communities, gender relations, and sexualities across cultural ad geographical regions of the world. Emphasizing a transnational feminist perspective that explores the linkages and connections between the global South and North, the course will focus on key issues of migration, global conflict, environment, helath and violence and the collective responses and social movements resisting globalization.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 3820 - GENDER & GLOBAL MIGRATION Course Description

    In the past fifty years global migration has emerged as one of the most significant social processes of our time. This course provides a general overview of contemporary global patterns of migration and examines the various social, cultural, and political contexts that shape the trends and characteristics of migratory flows. The main analytical focus of the course is the gendered patterns of migration, and its intersection with race, and other forms of social inequalities as they shape the experiences, treatment, and practices of inclusion and exclusion of immigrants in various countries around the world. Students will study how immigrant women and men experience work, the family, and communities, and how policies and political mobilization affect immigrants in various receiving contexts. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: WGS 1800

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



     
  • Writing Intensive - WPU is committed to a nurturing learning environment in which writing and technology literacies are taken seriously across disciplines. Many courses at WPU are designated as “WI” or “TI.” These are attributes to courses which could be in any major discipline or in the Core. •Four (4) Writing Intensive (WI) courses •Two (2) Technology Intensive (TI) courses


    UCC-Some Sec may be Writ Int
    ANTH 2570 - SEX, GENDER & SEXUALITY Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ANTH 2600 - MYTH/FOLKLORE MOD WORLD Course Description

    Myth and Folklore play important multiple roles in all cultures. This course looks at the patterns of moral values, social order, customs and religious beliefs as they are expressed through traditional folklore (narratives, songs, jokes etc.) and modern folklore (mass media, urban cultures). The course also explores common themes and provides a variety of theoretical models for explanation. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 3500 - SHAMANS WITCHES & MAGIC Course Description

    This course introduces students to the anthropological study of religion. Theories about the origins and functions of religion are examined, along with the role of religion in traditional non-Western societies. Shamanism, witchcraft, magic, religion in non-Western medicine, and religion conflict and change in the modern world are among the topics covered. Some sections of this course are Writing Intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 3500 - LIT OF AMERICAN CULTURES Course Description

    This course will offer a study of the literature of American cultures with a focus on Native American, Latino/a, Asian American, and African American writers and texts. In its focus on issues of identity(racial-based, class-based, and gender-based), this comparative study of Ethnic American literature explores the ways in which identities are constructed in literary texts. To understand the socio-cultural context of literary works, the course will encourage students to examine the historical background of each author and his/her text as examples of how each respective group responds to life in the United States, in particular its often conflicted and mediated relation with dominant cultural norms. Finally, we will examine how authors deploy imaginative, narrative, and linguistic strategies in literature to comment upon issues of diversity and social injustice. This course may include short stories, novels, poetry, autobiography,memoir, and drama. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 1030 - FOUNDATIONS OF CIVILIZATION Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the origins of human civilizations and their development through the 13th century CE in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas. Topics include: the comparitive analysis of the origins of urban societies; the rise of imperial systems; the construction of ethnic, religious and philosophical identities; and conflict, trade, and communication among pre-modern societies. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1010 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writing, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 1040 - THE EARLY MODERN WORLD Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the shaping of the first global age (1200-1800 C.E.). It traces political, economic, social, and cultural developments as well as interactions among the principal regions of the world: Europe, the Americas, Africa, and Asia during the late Middle Ages and the Early Modern era. Topics will include exploration, conquest, and colonialism; religions co-existence, conflict and conversion; medical, technological, and scientific exchange; economic networks; and war and peace. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1020 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writing, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 1050 - THE MODERN WORLD Course Description

    This course provides broad coverage of the formation of the modern world from the late 18th century to the present. It traces political, economic, social, and cultural developments and interactions among the principal regions of the world Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia and the Americas from the Atlantic Revolutions and their aftermath to our contemporary era. Topics include: the American, French and Haitian revolutions, the Latin American independence movements, industrialization, colonialism and anti-colonialism, nationalism, the World Wars and their aftermath, the Cold War, and globalization. Writing-intensive sections of HIST 1030 will require students to submit approximately 12 pages of formal writng, including a research paper, Blackboard discussion questions, in-class writing, and/or reading logs and journals. Prerequisite: BRI 1090

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 2020 - WORLD HISTORY SINCE 1500 Course Description

    This foundational course explores global history chronologically and thematically, focusing on the inter-relationships among world regions in the era from 1500 to the present. It surveys cultural, economic and political interactions, and the continuing processes of global integration as well as differentiation. Students will read primary sources, and learn to use and interpret charts, documents, maps, graphs, and web resources. The course will familiarize students with historical interpretations and how the past is examined and debated, and will require a research paper. Prior to taking HIST 202, students should take a 1000-level survey of the pre-1500 world (HIST 1010, 10300, or 10400). This course fills the World History 2000-level requirement for Majors and is open to all students. Writing intensive sections of the course will require a minimum of 12 pages of formal writing. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3140 - HISTORYOF NEW JERSEY Course Description

    An examination in historical perspective of political, economic, and social institutions of New Jersey and the influence of adjacent areas. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3310 - 20TH CENTURY RUSSIA Course Description

    After an inquiry into the causes and effects of the revolutions of 1905 and 1917, a study is made of the Soviet regime under Lenin, Stalin, Malenkov, Khrushchev, Brezhnev, and Kosygin. Attention is given to internal industrial, agricultural, social, political, and cultural development as well as to the role of the Soviet Union in world affairs. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 or HIST 1020 or HIST 1030 or HIST 1040 or HIST 1050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4290 - RUSSIAN REV 1917-1932 Course Description

    This course examines the causes and impact of the revolutions of 1917, the major political parties and figures, and the social dynamics within the revolutionary movement. The course then focuses on the first fifteen years of Soviet power, delving into the type of society created, the conflicts within the leadership, and the rise of Stalin. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    KNES 3530 - PSYCH MOTOR LEARNING Course Description

    Acquaints the student with the concepts and principles involved in motor skill learning and performance; in particular, the implications for teaching and progressions in learning are stressed. A laboratory experience provides opportunities to replicate theoretical constructs. The in-person section of this course is writing-intensive. Prerequisite: KNES 2300 AND PSY 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LBST 2010 - LIBERAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM Course Description

    The portal course to Liberal Studies, the colloquium will vary thematically but will be guided by common objectives. The course introduces students to interdisciplinary, inquiry-based learning. It requires extensive engagement with reading material, substantial writing, library research, and use of instructional technology. These set the framework for the entire program. Colloquium topics may include, for example, "Life Span," Gender and Society," "Diasporas", "War and Peace," Technology and Society," "Citizenship in a Global Age", or "Individual Freedom and Social Obligation".

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MGT 3150 - HUMAN RESOURCE PLAN/DEV Course Description

    This course introduces students to the theories and practices of human capital management, specifically emphasizing the role human resources plays as a strategic partner in supporting, upholding, and delivering a business entities mission and values. Students will develop and apply the critical thinking skills necessary to integrate the myriad of moving parts involved in the human capital planning process by applying them to real life business situations designed to move a company forward. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Prerequisite: MGT 2000

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MGT 4600 - BUS STRATEGY/POLICY Course Description

    This three credit course irepresents a case study approach to business decision-making that integrates functional and organizational disciplines. It examines a series of complex industrial situations in depth to determine, in each instance, the strategy and policies a firm should follow for its long-run survival. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Prerequisite: ACCT 2120 AND ECON 2100 AND MGT 2000 AND MKT 2100 AND FIN 3200

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 1150 - UNDERSTANDING MUSIC Course Description

    The course will introduce students to music's role as an art form and as an expression of the human experience including the meaning and value of music within societies and individual lives within a historiical setting. Music from a variety of genres, styles, time periods and geographical locations of origin wll be studied, as well as the manner in which the elements of music are utilized within these settings. The course will include the development of attentive listening skills and effective cmmunicaito about music.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 3280 - PHILOSOPHY OF SPACE AND TIME Course Description

    This course investigates issues concerning the ontology and epistemology of space and time. Such issues include whether time and space exist independently of the mind, whether they exist independently of one another (or instead form a unified manifold, spacetime), what accounts for the apparent unidirectionality of time, whether times other than the present exist, and the nature of (and whether there is any such thing as) identity over time. Some sections of this course are writing intensive

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHIL 4200 - PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Course Description

    Analyzes the logic of scientific inquiry and the logical structure of its intellectual products. Primarily an examination of both logical patterns exhibited in the organization of scientific knowledge and logical methods whose use, despite changes in special techniques and revolution in substantive theory, is the most enduring feature of modern science. Prerequisite: PHIL 1100 OR PHIL 1120 OR PHIL 1500 OR PHIL 2200

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PHIL 4800 - PHIL CAPSTONE SEMINAR Course Description

    This course provides an in-depth study of a single philosopher, philosophical topic, or philosophical question, chosen by the instructor. Prerequisite: PHIL 1100 OR PHIL 1120 OR PHIL 1500 OR PHIL 2200 OR PHIL 2320

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 1160 - AFRICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT Course Description

    This course traces the historical evolution of African political thought, emphasizing the philosophical, socio-economic, intellectual and other circumstances that have shaped particular strands of political philosophy amongst thinkers of African origin. This course will help students compare and contrast the way African thought apporaches the questions of human existence and those who have different historical and material experiences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 2250 - RACE, GENDER & SOC JUSTICE Course Description

    This course analyzes multiple forms of social oppression and inequality based on race (and color), sex (and gender), sexual orientation (and identity), and class in the United States. It will examine systemic aspects of social oppression in different periods and contexts and the ways that systems of social oppression manifest themselves on individual, cultural, institutional and/or global levels thus becoming self-perpetuating but not wholly unaltered structures. Individual and group agency, strategies of resistance, and visions for change will also be studied.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 2570 - SEX, GENDER & SEXUALITY Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. Some sections of this course are writing intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    UCC-Writing Intensive
    ANTH 2400 - LANGUAGE MATTERS Course Description

    Focusing on the complex interplay between biology and culture, this course uses evidence, concepts, theories and perspectives from the four fields of anthropology (biological, socio-cultural, linguistic, archaeological) to explore diverse patterns of sex, gender and sexuality amongst humans, human ancestors and non-human primates. This perspective will form the groundwork from which to critically evaluate discourses that reduce sex, gender and sexuality to a matter of nature alone; notions used to legitimize inequalities of sex and sexuality and pathologize non-normative sex, gender and sexualities. Adopting a social justice approach, we will explore contemporary struggles of self-determination in which sex, gender and sexuality are central. This course is Writing Intensive. Course offered Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters only. Prerequisite:ANTH 1300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 3700 - ANTH SOCIAL MOVEMENTS Course Description

    This course provides students with a critical understanding of the key issues in the development of social movements and civic action from the perspective of anthropology. Anthropology’s unique on-the-ground and comparative perspective, and its emphasis on particularity and context will afford insights into issues of meaning at the center of social movements. Students will examine various models of public- and field-generated scholarship and apply this knowledge in a qualitative project that recognizes community members’ knowledge as key to social change in everyday life – where inequalities are experienced and often resisted. Examples of social movements appropriate for ethnographic research: Occupy, Tea Party, buy local, ACORN, immigrant rights, etc. This is a writing intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 4900 - ANTHROPOLOGY SENIOR SEMINAR Course Description

    This course helps students acquire core professional competencies that facilitate pursuing diverse career paths. It provides students with the tools and resources needed to apply for admission to graduate programs and employment in profit or nonprofit (grant-seeking) agencies. This course fosters critical thinking, oral and written communication skills, and research expertise while building upon knowledge acquired in other upper-level anthropology courses. It nurtures intellectual autonomy, as well as a deeper sense of social commitment and ethical conscience. Prerequisite: at least one 400-level anthropology course. Course offered Spring Semester only. Prerequisite: ANTH 4200 OR ANTH 4210 OR ANTH 4250 OR ANTH 4540

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 2280 - MEDIEVAL ART Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to the visual culture of the European “Middle Ages,” from the conversion of Constantine in the 4th century to the first stages of Renaissance style. Students examine architecture, sculpture, painting, and metalwork from the early Christian, Byzantine, early Medieval, Romanesque, and Gothic periods. In each case, the class investigates the cultural forces that shaped the works of art and discusses the ways in which the objects might have been received in their own times. The course also considers the objects’ relevance in the 21st century. This course is Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: ARTH 1010 OR ARTH 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 2330 - ARTS OF AFRICA Course Description

    This course examines the arts of Western and sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. as we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery's Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTH 3000 - RESEARCH METHOD & THEORY Course Description

    This course is the first half of the Art History Senior Capstone sequence. It introduces students to the methods and theories that have defined—and that continue to challenge—the discipline. We will examine and analyze some of the many methodologies that define art history, from its beginnings in Formalism and Biography to Iconography, Marxism, Feminism, and Post-Structuralism. By reading, writing, and debating about the central issues that inform the study of art, students will begin to understand the complexity of the discipline. Over the course of the semester, students will write a number of critical response papers and journal entries while developing topics for their Senior Thesis projects. Student work will culminate in both oral and written final projects.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTH 3220 - GREEK AND ROMAN ART Course Description

    This course provides an introduction to the architecture, sculpture, and painting produced by the Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman civilizations. We will begin with the late Bronze Age (c.1500 BCE) and continue through the Roman Empire (c. 400 CE). Major themes include: the interrelationships of art, religion, and the state in the ancient world; the arts of Greece and Rome as the cultural heritage of the West; and the role of Greek and Roman art in the field of Art History. Class meetings will consist of lectures and some “workshop” periods. During “workshop,” students will participate in active discussions, in-class assignments, and group projects. This course is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTH 3380 - ISLAMIC ART&ARCHITECTURE Course Description

    This course presents the arts of Muslim cultures from the beginnings of Islam in the early seventh century to the modern period. Students examine architectural monuments from palaces to mosques as well as small-scale “luxury” items like textiles, metalwork, ceramics, and illuminated manuscripts. Lectures and discussions explore the diversity of Islamic art throughout the world, observing its role in the Middle East, Asia, and North Africa as well as its influence on the West. We will also connect the history of Islamic art with the contemporary world through discussions and a visit to the Brooklyn Museum of Art, which currently houses the most extensive collection of Islamic arts on view in the New York metropolitan area. This is a Writing Intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTS 4930 - BA STUDIO SENIOR SEMINAR Course Description

    This course directs the BA Studio student to prepare visual, written, and oral presentations to showcase their acquired skills through the assembly of a hard copy and digital portfolio of visual and written work, as well as supervised research in the development of career goals and career opportunities. Covers selected topics in the areas of art history, art criticism, art technology, art theory, and business practices as they pertain to a professional career in studio art.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 4940 - BFA STUDIO SENIOR SEMINAR Course Description

    Covers selected topics in the areas of art history, art criticism, art technology, art theory, and business practices as they pertain to a professional career in studio art. This course directs the BFA student to prepare visual, written, and oral presentations to showcase their acquired skills through the assembly of a hard copy and digital portfolio of visual and written work. Research and development of career goals and career opportunities, as well as supervised research and planning in preparation for the development of the Senior Thesis Project.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3020 - JAPANESE LIT&FILM IN TRANSL Course Description

    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies— ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the "new classics" on celluloid and animé—the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today's world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ASN 4800 - ASIAN STUDIES SENIOR SEMINAR Course Description

    This senior capstone course allows students to conduct in-depth research and writing on Asia. Seminar topics vary according to the discipline of the Asian Studies faculty member teaching the particular seminar. Students are required to read scholarly literature in the particular field covered in the seminar and to use their knowledge of Asia acquired in this course and in core and elective courses in order to produce a senior seminar paper. Students are required to present their research paper in class. Students are encouraged to present their findings in public venues, such as Asian Studies student-faculty colloquia or Asian Studies conferences. Capstone for Asian Studies major. (Cross-listed with other 400-level courses approved for Asian Studies major). Prerequisite: ASN 2010 AND (ASN 2700 OR ASN 2800)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ATEP 2500 - CLINICAL EXPERIENCE IN AT I Course Description

    This is a beginning level class in the athletic training major. This course is designed to give the sophomore student athletic training clinical experience working with William Paterson athletic teams. The course is designed to instruct the student in the application of beginning clinical principles and techniques in the traditional athletic training setting under the supervision of an approved clinical instructor certified athletic trainer. Also, this course is the students' first research and writing intensive course in the athletic training discipline. 2 credits Prerequisites: ATEP 2400 and admission to the ATEP professional preparation phase;

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    AWS 2040 - HARLEM RENAISSANCE Course Description

    This is a course that studies the historical, artistic, and political movement centered in Harlem, New York from the 1910s to the mid 1930s commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. It investigates the diasporic connections between Harlem and both Africa and the Caribbean. In addition, it emphasizes the contributions of women writers to a movement traditionally seen as a largely male preserve. Further, it investigates the fraught relationship between race, sexuality, and artistic expression. Readings may include texts by Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and others. This is a Writing Intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    AWS 2330 - ARTS OF AFRICA Course Description

    This course examines the arts of Western and Sub-Saharan Africa, from its earliest moments to the modern era. We will study expressive wooden sculptures, fine golden objects, elaborate textiles, and colorful wall paintings, locating them in their social and ritual contexts. As we explore the diversity of African art, we will also examine its transformation in New World contexts such as Cuba, Haiti, and Brazil. Using the Ben Shahn Gallery’s Joan and Gordon Tobias Collection of African Art, we will have direct experience with African objects. This course is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    BIO 3630 - TERRESTRIAL PLANT ECOLOGY Course Description

    Introduction to the scientific study of plant ecology. Topics include population and community dynamics, evolution of life history traits, physiological responses to environmental stresses, plant-animal interactions, and the role of vegetation in ecosystem processes. Field and laboratory studies explore experimental and analytical techniques used in plant ecology. All sections of this course are writing intensive. Prerequisite: BIO 2490

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 4800 - BIOLOGY SEMINAR Course Description

    Restricted to senior biology and biotechnology majors. The course requires each student to do an in-depth study of a selected topic within the field of biology. The study will involve finding and evaluating primary research articles, oral presentation of relevant research methods and findings, and preparation of a technical term paper in formal scientific format. This study will be supplemented by in-class activities that will reinforce students’ ability to synthesize, analyze, and communicate scientific ideas through writing.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 4990 - INDEPENDENT STUDY Course Description

    Individual research projects under the direction of a faculty member.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CCJ 3010 - RESEARCH METHODS Course Description

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research methods, including the process by which research questions are formulated, relevant literature is reviewed, data are collected and analyzed, and results are written up. As this is a writing intensive course, students will learn methods in part through weekly writing assignments. A subset of these assignments will combine to form a research project in which students review the literature on a particular research question and present the results of basic data analysis. The end product of the course will be a research paper of approximately twenty pages that has been improved through an iterative process of feedback by the professor and revision by the student. All sections of this course are writing and technology intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 2130 OR CCJ 3680

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CCJ 3680 - CRIMINOLOGY Course Description

    This course will introduce to the students an overview of (1) the concepts of crime, law and criminology; (2) theories of crime causation; (3) the nature and extent and patterns of different kinds of crimes and social reactions towards the crimes in the American society; and (4) relevant crimes and social policies in other countries. As a writing intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn the concepts and theories outlined above and as a way to train themselves in conventional styles of criminological writing. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CCJ 2610

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CCJ 4820 - SENIOR SEM IN CRIM JUSTICE Course Description

    An in-depth, critical analysis of the literature in the field of criminology and criminal justice. Each student is expected to select a specific criminal justice organization, problem or policy, explore the current research literature, and carry out a research project on the topic, culminating in a presentation at the end of the semester. Thge course content will be dependent upon the topics selected by the students int he class. Students will likley conne ct their research topics to their Internships (CCJ 4920 Internship in Criminology and Criminal Justice taken concurrently). This is a Writing Intensive course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CCJ 3010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CGSI 4010 - COGNITIVE SCI HONORS THESIS I Course Description

    This is a research based course that is the first part of a two semester thesis. Although students will have already been exposed to at least one research methods course prior to the thesis course, an overview of the logic of research and the methodology will be presented. This overview will also serve to highlight the various options students will have for their own research projects. Research methods open to the students include computer modeling and simulations, experimental and quasi-experimental designs, qualitative research methodologies, discourse analysis and think-aloud protocols. The 'how to' of research will be explored in detail. Students, in consultation with faculty, will select a topic for their research project. The exploration of the research topic will be the primary focus of the course. Formal oral and written presentations of the research proposal as well as summaries and research notes of a minimum of twelve research articles relevant to the student’s individual topic will be completed. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CGSI 3000 AND PSY 2030

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CGSI 4020 - COGNITIVE SCI HONORS THESIS II Course Description

    This is the second component to the Cognitive Science Honors Thesis. Students will have already selected a research topic for their thesis, and the literature review will have been completed. The focus of this component of the thesis will be on data collection, analysis and interpretation of their work. Students will present their research in both oral and written forms. At the end of this course students will have completed a final draft of a thesis (approximately 50 pages) for submission to the honors college. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: CGSI 4010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 4280 - BIOCHEMISTRY II Course Description

    This course elaborates on topics discussed in CHEM 4270 (Biochemistry) and extends students’ knowledge of biochemistry to include the primary catabolic and anabolic pathways. Topics covered include the TCA cycle, electron transport chains and the mechanisms of replication, transcription and translation. This course covers many of the key techniques used in metabolomics and in the elucidation of biochemical pathways. This is a writing and technology intensive course. Prerequisite: CHEM 4270

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CHIN 4000 - SEMINAR CHINESE LIT & CULTURE Course Description

    This seminar is designed to expand students' knowledge of Chinese literature and culture through reading and discussion of major works in Chinese. It delves into major trends and issues, secondary scholarship, and research methodology in the field. The seminar requires students to read critically and to analyze and write about texts of Chinese literature and culture using both traditional Chinese research methods and Western critical approaches. Taught in Chinese. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: ASN 2000 OR CHIN 2000

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CIEC 3100 - INCLUSION, ELL, DIFF LEARNER Course Description

    This online course will focus on developmentally appropriate methods of differentiating instruction for all students. This class will present theory and strategies to teach students who are English language learners. The course will also present theory and strategies to identify and teach preschool and elementary school students who may have mild to moderate disabilities, including learning disabilities and autism.. Connections will be made between various instructional models and individual student needs. Topics include core content curriculum methodology; second language acquisition; using the curriculum to facilitate second language learning; adaptation and modification strategies to address academic, behavioral, social, and emotional needs; methods to incorporate assessment results in IEP goals and objectives; and ways to develop and implement evaluation procedures to assess student progress. As a Writing Intensive course students will engage in writing-to-learn strategies (such as blackboard discussion, observational journals, and reading logs), as well as learn and apply skills for writing to communicate as professionals in the field of education. Prerequisite: CIED 2030 OR CIED 2040

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIED 2030 - TEACHING AS PROFESSION Course Description

    This course examines the historical and philosophical foundations of education, including introductory knowledge of lesson planning, classroom management, generic teaching methods, special education, learning styles, child development, legal issues, a code of ethics, multicultural education, and the role of reflection in teaching. Current issues are discussed such as vouchers, charter schools, and the roles of local, state, and federal governments in funding public education. Students conduct twenty hours of observations in P-3 (early childhood), K-5 (elementary), 5-8 (middle schools), or 9-12 (subject field) classrooms and assess their own abilities in relation to WPU Competencies and New Jersey Professional Teaching Standards. Students are introduced to e-portfolios, assess their dispositions, and develop an educational philosophy.As this is a Writing Intensive course, teacher candidates learn and apply skills that will allow them to write successfully for multiple audiences in the profession (students, parents, colleagues, and administrators). Teacher candidates also develop lesson plans and philosophy statements, creating multiple drafts and revisions of work based on peer and instructor feedback. They also engage in writing-to-learn strategies such as Double Entry Journals, free-writing activities, concept mapping, and journaling to reflect upon key concepts in education. Sophomore standing is recommended. Prerequisite: ANTH 2020 AND CS 2150 AND PSY 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIEE 3120 - LIT & LEARN INCLUSV CLASSRM Course Description

    This course provides a comprehensive overview of major theories and instructional approaches related to (1) the understanding of language and literacy development, and (2) the teaching of literacy to children in inclusive elelmentary classrooms. To achieve this goal, students will be expected to actively apply theories to classroom practice in their field experience. They will also be expected to critically examine and reflect on ways in which teachers can provide the environment and experiences needed to promote literacy development and learning for all children in inclusive classrooms. Part of the course requirement is a within-course supervised field experience in which students work with children on literacy activities. Students write to learn through a weekly reflective journal in which they use their growing understanding of theory to critically evaluate their practice in the field. They use research and documentation skills, evaluating the literacy needs of the children with whom they work. They learn and apply skills that will allow them to write successfully for multiple audiences in the field (students, parents, colleagues, and administrators). Students develop a Lesson Plan and a final Student Profile, creating multiple drafts and revisions based on peer and insructor feedback. Junior standing is recommended. Prerequisite: CIED 2030 OR SPC 2550

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CISE 4110 - METH TCHNG SEC SOC STUD Course Description

    This course examines methods and materials of teaching middle school and high school social studies. Social studies is defined as an interdisciplinary field which includes history, geography, sociology, psychology, anthropology, political science and economics, and which examines social problems over time and in different time and places. Social studies is presented as a means of understanding the unity and diversity of peoples and societies worldwide. The course examines the history of social studies, various orientations to the goals and methods of social studies, and various approaches to planning and teaching lessons. As a Writing Intensive course students will engage in writing to learn strategies such as written responses to initiatory activity prompts, drafting and presenting positions for a debate, and writing syntheses of conflicting primary and secondary source accounts of historical events, as well as learn to apply these skills to rationale papers and lesson plans on different orientations to the social studies.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2100 - MEDIA WRITING Course Description

    Media writing is a course designed to introduce students to the forms, limitations and potentials of writing for and about the various media, including writing for radio, television, film, and print journalism. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2300 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION Course Description

    In the 21st century, organizations are a central fact of human existence. This class provides an introduction to organizational communication; preparing students to understand and effectively participate in organizational life. The course surveys various aspects of organizational communication from an overview of theoretical frameworks to applications. Particular attention will be paid to processes, forms and functions of organizational communication, and to contemporary organizational issues such as diversity, technology, and team work. Prerequisite: COMM 2340

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    COMM 2310 - ORGANIZATIONAL COMM Course Description

    In the twenty-first century, organizations are a central fact of human existence. This class provides an introduction to organizational communication, preparing students to understand and effectively participate in organizational life. The course surveys various aspects of organizational communication from an overview of theoretical frameworks to applications. Particular attention is paid to process, forms, and functions of organizational communication, and to contemporary organizational issues such as diversity, technology, and team work.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    COMM 2500 - JOURNALISM Course Description

    This course includes practical experience in gathering news and writing the basic journalistic forms, including the straight news story and various types of features. Students undertake reporting assignments designed to develop skills in interviewing, observation, and writing, and receive individual evaluation of their work. Prerequisite: COMM 2100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 3480 - PUBLIC RELATIONS Course Description

    This course defines public relations and explores the appropriate functions and outlets for public relations activities. The course explores the basic tools of public relations. Students learn about various initiatives and tactical executions of the practice.\ Prerequisite: COMM 2100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4310 - SCREENWRITING Course Description

    This course is an introductory screenwriting course designed to present and explore the elements of the traditional, narrative screenplay. These elements include (but are not limited to) story structure,character development, action. dialogue, subtext, plot and theme. We will examine these elements, in detail, in both feature film and short film formats. Prerequisite: COMM 2340

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4450 - COMM CAPSTONE-INTERPERSONAL Course Description

    Working closely with individual faculty members and the course coordinator, students will conduct an in-depth communication research study, or create an advanced level communication project in this primary area of their expertise. Students registering for this course must complete a standardized form detailing the capstone project. The semester long project will be determined by the student and approved by the directing faculty member and the faculty coordinator. Students must complete COMM 1190 and major requirements before taking capstone. Permission is required for registration. Prerequisite: COMM 1190 AND COMM 1210 AND COMM 2240 AND COMM 2650 AND COMM 3400 AND COMM 3600 AND COMM 4630

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4490 - PUBLIC RELATIONS WKSHOP Course Description

    This course provides background and practice in developing written communications important in the practice of public relations. Using a workshop format, the course emphasizes planning, writing, and targeting communications designed to influence specific audiences. Prerequisite: COMM 3480

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4560 - PLAYWRITING Course Description

    A study and practice in the basic techniques of playwriting. Emphasizes dramatic structure and characterization, developed through the process of writing and revising assignments and drafts of plays. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 3500 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Course Description

    This course provides a hands-on experience with the issues and techniques of software engineering. A team project applying the techniques covered is the main focus of the course. This course introduces the fundamental princples and practices of the software development process to produce quality software sytems. Several developmental paradigms, processes, models and methods will be discussed. The topics cover the entire software lfecycle that includes requirement analysis and specification, design, implementation, testing, integration, maintenance/evolution, documentation, and project management. The course also introduces APIs, CASE tools and environments, as well as the UML ( Unified Modeling Language). Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CS 3420

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 4800 - COMPUTER SCIENCE SEMINAR Course Description

    This is the capstone course required of all computer science majors. The course is conducted in seminar form featuring internal as well as external speakers. Approximately two-thirds of the course covers current topics of interest in computer science and computing technology; the remaining one-third of the course is dedicated to social impact of computers and ethical issues faced by today's computer professionals. Students are required to select a relevant topic and complete a substantial research-oriented project either individually or as a team. As the end of the project, students are expected to submit a substantial written report and orally present it to the public. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    EDUC 4150 - SENIOR TEACHNG INTERNSHP Course Description

    The internship is a 16 week teaching experience in a field placement. It is designed to apply learning about professional knowledge, humanistic practices and reflective thinking to classroom situations on a full-time basis for one semester. Students are observed a minimum of eight times by a University supervisor who regularly reviews student journals including lesson plans, reflective writing, and other documents. In conjunction with the field experience, students attend a weekly seminar that meets for the entire semester and has three primary goals: 1) discussion and reflection of current issues and students' teaching experiences, while brainstorming solutions to classroom problems 2)creation of a Professional Portfolio (an E-Portfolio - Live Text) which includes lesson plans, evaluations, philosophy of education, teaching artifacts linked to New Jersey Standards, and other documents. Students write reflective statements related to the standards 3) career development skills and documents are developed including preparation of a resume and cover letter, interviewing skills, credentials filed, etc. the seminar instructor provides feedback on each portfolio and assists students in developing appropriate materials.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    EDUC 4190 - SEN STUD TEACH INTERNSHIP K-12 Course Description

    The student Teaching Internship is a 16 week teaching experience in an urban or sub-urban school setting. The internship is designed to apply learning about professional knowledge, humanistic practices, community and civic engagement within education, and reflective thinking to classroom situations on a full-time basis for one semester. Students are observed a minimum of eight times by a university professor who regularly reviews student journals, lesson plans, and other work or writings related to the students growth as a future teacher. Student-teachers work in secondary classrooms with students who have varied cultural and linguistic backgrounds and exceptionalities. A seminar, CISE 4500: Reckoning with the Past and Preparing for a Future in Education, accompanies, and is an integral part of the internship. The seminar meets on a weekly basis throughout the semester for discussion and reflection of the students' teaching experiences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 1100 - COLLEGE WRITING Course Description

    A workshop course in which students develop pieces of writing, taking them through various stages of planning and revision. Students share their writing with the instructor and their peers, get feedback on drafts, and consider this feedback as they progress through the writing process. This course develops students' writing competency on the college level. Prerequisite: ENG 1080

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 1500 - EXPERIENCES IN LITERATURE Course Description

    Develops the student's appreciation and enjoyment of selected works in fiction, drama, and poetry. Works selected represent different historical periods and cultures. Substantial writing is required. Prerequisite: ENG 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 2000 - METHODS OF LITERARY ANALYSIS Course Description

    An writing-intensive course in which students undertake an in-depth study of selected short stories, poems, plays, and/or novels, with focus on analytical and evaluative techniques of interpretation. Within the context of various critical frameworks, students gain practice in employing precise literary terms, understanding genre conventions, situating work in historical, biographic, cultural, and theoretical contexts, and conducting research. This portal course is required for all English majors. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 2310 - INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING Course Description

    A workshop leading to the development of writing skills in poetry and fiction; may also cover such genres as drama, screenwriting, and creative non-fiction. Through readings and discussions on topics such as style, theme, and voice, students are encouraged to develop imaginative power and originality in creative writing. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 2500 - HARLEM RENAISSANCE Course Description

    This is a course that studies the historical, artistic, and political movement centered in Harlem, New York from the 1910s to the mid 1930s commonly referred to as the Harlem Renaissance. It investigates the diasporic connections between Harlem and both Africa and the Caribbean. In addition, it emphasizes the contributions of women writers to a movement traditionally seen as a largely male preserve. Further, it investigates the fraught relationship between race, sexuality, and artistic expression. Readings may include texts by Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Alain Locke, W.E.B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and others. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ENG 3300 - CRITICAL WRITING I Course Description

    This course in nonfiction writing covers a variety of forms and genres, such as the academic paper, the book or film review, the personal essay, and the editorial. Students produce frequent expository and/or analytical writings on selected cultural topics. While learning to edit their own as well as others' work, students develop skills in writing-as-process, grammar and style, argument, persuasion, and research. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENG 3690 - IMAGINING WAR Course Description

    This course will develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the literary and historical context of war and challenge them to explore a variety of issues (gender, social class, pacifism, nationalism, the Home Front) through reading, writing, and discussion of literary and historical texts. These texts may vary by genre, historical period, or country of origin, and may include primary sources, memoir, poetry, fiction, film, media, and the visual arts. The goal of the course is to explore a single war from the 20th or 21st century. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENG 1500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ENG 4920 - WRITING CAPSTONE Course Description

    An in-depth writing intensive exploration of a special litererary topic or genre. Through practice of interpretive and compositional literary skills at advanced levels, portfolio preparation, and guidance on publishing and career opportunities, this course serves as a capstone experience for English Majors in the Writing Concentration. Prerequisite: ENG 2000

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ENV 3800 - JUNIOR SEMINAR Course Description

    This course isdesigned to give third-year students a chance to reflect upon their reasoning processes and learn how to evaluate critically a number of topics of major environmental concern. Methods of critical evaluation are taught as a means of investigating the logic and reasoning behind ideas and concepts. Arguments are analyzed for format, logic, justification and persuasiveness. All students are expected to take an active part in the discussions and evaluations. Oral and written reports on specific topics are discussed and team debate as needed. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 3380 - GEOGRAPHY OF US & CANADA Course Description

    Canada and the United States share a common heritage and, historically, they have moved towards similar social and economic goals. These factors, along with geographical contiguity and proximity have produced a commonality of culture and mutual interdependence. Yet, there are clear-cut economic, demographic, and social differences between the two countries. This course provides a basis for understanding the United States and Canada by examining their geographical similarities and differences. Emphasis is placed on the identification and interpretation of spatial patterns and processes associated with physical environment and natural resources, economic structure, settlement patterns, population, immigration, land use, urbanization, and ethnicity at national, regional, and urban levels. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 2600 - HISTORICAL METHODS Course Description

    This course is foundational for History majors. It focuses on the theory and practice of historcal thinking and wsriting and emphasizes research and writing methods and skills. History majors must take this course duing their first semesters of coursework in the Major, and cannot take 400 level (capstone) courses without successfully completing History 2600. All sections of the course are Writing Intensive; some lsections of the course are proposed to be Technology Intensive. Fifteen pages of finished writing are required, including a research paper. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3100 - MODERN FRANCE SINCE 1815 Course Description

    The development of France, one of the first democratic republics, from the Bourbon Restoration in 1814 through the Fifth Republic today, featuring a multifaceted approach to French history. Emphasis is on continuity versus change and stability versus instability. The course explores the reasons for France's decline and later resurgence as a European power. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3120 - THE REFORMATION Course Description

    Martin Luther’s challenge to the Catholic Church in 1517 led to 150 years of religious reformations and wars in Europe, and Christian evangelization around the world. This course examines the origins of the reformation movements (Lutheran, Calvinist, radical, and Catholic) and assesses the impact on European society, culture, and politics during the early modern period. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3250 - AMERICAN ETHNIC HISTORY Course Description

    Exploring John F. Kennedy's theme of "A Nation of Immigrants," the course focuses on the mass migrations that shaped American development into the twentieth century. The causes of immigration, the economic and cultural adjustment of the newcomers, and their impact are studied in the light of historical evidence. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3300 - RUSSIAN EMPIRE Course Description

    Examines society, politics, and culture of Imperial Russia from the reign of Peter the Great to the last Romanovs. Major topics include serfdom, intellectual currents, and nineteenth-century revolutionary movements.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3410 - HITLER & NAZI GERMANY Course Description

    This course probes several topics related to Nazi Germany and Hitler. Emphasis is given to following topics–Weimar democracy and its difficulties, the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party, the consolidation of Hitler’s power (1933-38), reasons for Nazi party popularity, pre-war aggression and World War II, the use of terror and the Holocaust, and the everyday experiences of women and the youth. This course extensively uses both primary and secondary texts in examining these issues in detail. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3690 - IMAGINING WAR Course Description

    This course will develop students’ appreciation and understanding of the literary and historical context of war and challenge them to explore a variety of issues (gender, social class, pacifism, nationalism, the Home Front) through reading, writing, and discussion of literary and historical texts. These texts may vary by genre, historical period, or country of origin, and may include primary sources, memoir, poetry, fiction, film, media, and the visual arts. The goal of the course is to explore a single war from the 20th or 21st century. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 or HIST 1020 or HIST 1030 or HIST 1040 or HIST 1050.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 3720 - MEDIEVAL & EARLY MOD FRANCE Course Description

    This course will provide students with an understanding of the major political, social, cultural and economic events that shaped France between 987 and 1789. The class will focus on the expansion and contraction of royal power at different historical moments, the place of the Church in French society, social relations between men and women of different strata, and artistic and cultural developments including the Gothic and Enlightenment movements. This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4040 - CREATION OF AMERICAN REPUBLIC Course Description

    This course will provide an in-depth exploration of the creation of the early American Republic (circa 1763-1825). The course will focus on the events and issues central to the process of nation building, including: the origin, nature, and consequences of the American Revolution; the early years of government under the Articles of Confederation; the adoption of the United States Constitution; the place of slavery in the new nation; and the cultural, social, economic, and political development of the new nation. The seminar is Writing Intensive and requires a minimum of 20 pages of formal writing, including a research paper. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4200 - POLITICS & SOCIAL MOVEMENTS Course Description

    This senior-level History seminar focuses on politics and social movements in diverse societies during the Cold War. It begins with a historical survey of World War II to identify the roots of the Cold War and the emergence of the Three-World Order that came to characterize the post-1945 period. Thereafter, it examines critical social movements in the First, Second, and Third World during the Cold War with special emphasis on the 1960s and 1980s. The course integrates multi-disciplinary approaches and materials to analyze how the Cold War impacted social movements and how Cold War politics in turn were influenced by social movements. The course requires a research paper combining a variety of approaches and documentation pertaining to the history of social movements at the end of the Cold War, plus other ongoing formal writing assignments throughout the course. This course fulfills the UCC Writing Intensive and Area 5 Civic Engagement requirements. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4280 - STALIN AND HIS TIMES Course Description

    An examination of Stalin's rise within the leadership of the communist party and Soviet state, Stalin's impact on Soviet domestic policy and international affairs, and the process of de- Stalinization since the 1950s through the present. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4300 - FRENCH REV/NAPOLEONIC ERA Course Description

    Examines crucial periods such as the revolution of 1789, the revolutionary Year II, the revolutionary dictatorship and the Terror, and the Napoleonic era. While political history is stressed, great emphasis is placed on social history. This course is writing intensive and requires a minimum of 25 pages of writing. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4330 - COMPARATIVE REVOLUTIONS Course Description

    A comparative study of revolution as a historical phenomenon, starting with a thorough examination of the concept and its application to events that have occurred in varoius parts of the world in the modern era. An anlysis of various theoretical models of revolutionary change will provide the tools to compare revolutions in varoius historical and cultural settings. The seminar is Writing Intensive and requires a minimum of 20 pages of formal writing, including a research paper. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 4800 - HIST SEMINAR: Course Description

    An in-depth examination of a particular historical period, country, or theme, this upper-level writing-intensive course engages students in analytical reading and writing, and in the production of individual research projects. The seminar requires a minimum of 20 pages of formal writing, including a research paper. Students will demonstrate and build on the skills and knowledge they have acquired in the History major, including in the required core courses and electives. Topics will vary to reflect the instructor's area of expertise. Prerequisite: HIST 2600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    JPAN 3020 - JAPANESE LIT&FILM IN TRANSL Course Description

    This course examines Japanese literature and film as world literature and global cinema. Through the study of major works we will seek to understand why Japan’s aesthetics, literary themes, and popular expressions have become integral to global culture today. We will trace the multiple cultural influences flowing to and from Japan, asking what has changed and what has continued over the centuries. Drawing upon novels, drama, poetry, and movies— ranging from classics like The Tale of Genji, Nobel-winning authors, and manga superstars to the "new classics" on celluloid and animé—the course traces the movement of Japanese literature from isolation on the edge of Asia to a position of cultural centrality in today's world, while we examine the works on their merits. This is a writing intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    JPAN 4000 - SEM JAPANESE LIT & CULTURE Course Description

    This capstone Seminar will expand students’ knowledge of Japanese literature and culture through reading and discussion of major works in Japanese. It explores trends and issues in literary scholarship, introduces research methodology in the field, and deepens understanding of the cultural contexts of literary works. The seminar requires students to read critically and to analyze and write about Japanese literature and culture using both Japanese and Western critical approaches. This is a Writing Intensive course required of all ASN Majors in the Language: Japanese concentration and all who will seek teacher certification in Japanese. May be used to fulfill the ASN 4800 Senior Seminar requirement. Taught in Japanese and English with writing exercises in both languages. Prerequisite: JPAN 2110

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LAS 2330 - LATIN AMER LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course examines Latin American writers and their contributions to world literature. Analyzing various literary genres, which may include short fiction, poetry, testimony or the novel, the course explores social, cultural, political, economic, and global influences that have shaped Latin American writing. Emphasis is placed on figures like: Pablo Neruda, Jorge L. Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Roberto Bolaño, Clarice Lispector, Cesar Vallejo, Cristina Peri Rossi, Isabel Allende, Diamela Eltit, Juan C. Onetti, Carlos Fuentes, García Márquez, Jose Martí, Gabriela Mistral, among others. This course is taught in English but Spanish majors who take it as directed elective are required to complete the writing intensive component in Spanish.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    LBST 4800 - SR CAPSTONE SEMINAR Course Description

    This seminar will draw on students' experiences in the Liberal Studies Colloquium and in their two concentrations. Students will select an individual research topic that synthesizes interests they have developed within their concentrations. They will develop this topic throughout the term through extensive interdisciplinary research and writing. Students will share their projects with classmates through classroom presentations and/or online discussion groups, and will exchange detailed feedback with other students. Stuents will be expected not only to become experts on their topics, but also to teach their topics to their fellow students and to learn from their fellow students' responses to their topics. Prerequisite: LBST 2010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MATH 4900 - MATH SEMINAR Course Description

    This is a required course for all mathematics majors and should be taken, if possible, in the junior year. The course will be led by a faculty member and conducted in an inquiry based fashion, with coverage of topics determined by the interests of the students and faculty. Each student will complete a project of study in an area of mathematics or its applications, culminating in a presentation to the faculty and students, and a final paper submitted to the faculty advisor.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MGT 3550 - VALUES,ETHICS & SUSTAINABILITY Course Description

    This course is designed to increase awareness of values, ethics, beliefs and attitudes, and how they relate to issues of sustainability. It will pay special attention to the manner in which corporations can become agents of injustice and inequality in society, and conversely, how they can be transformed by individual actors and by institutional reforms. This course will also analyze sustainability at the institutional level, focusing on socially and structually imbedded nature of corporate actions. this is a Writing Intensive Course. Prerequisite: MGT 2000 OR MKT 2100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2130 - ROCK MUSIC DIVERSITY&JUSTICE Course Description

    This course is a chronological survey of the history of American Popular Music documenting the power relations in the music industry, both systematically and individually. Also included are the roles the different performers of the different genres of music play in protest and civil rights movements. This couse is Writing Intensive.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2510 - SEA I:FUNDMNT & TRANSDUC Course Description

    The primary goal of this course is to provide an in-depth discussion of transducers and transducer theory as it relates to audio engineering including: microphone theory and types, magnetic recording principles and applications, mixing console signal flow and design, and loudspeaker theory and design. Primary auditory physiology and theory are presented and principles of wave motion, electricity, and acoustics are introduced. Students will submit written homework assignments, daily journal entries, and keep a comprehensive notebook of all class information as well as related audio information gathered through other readings and experiences. This is a writing and technology intensive course. Prerequisite: MUSI 1510

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2740 - JAZZ HISTORY & ANALYSIS II Course Description

    This course studies the evolution of jazz from the bebop period (1945-1950) to the present. It explores and analyzes important musical developments in the music, focusing on seminal individual musicians, groups, and musical movements. Historical and cultural factors that influenced the development of jazz are also explored at length. The course includes in-depth analysis of the styles and contributions of important jazz performers, arrangers and composers, and requires the students to apply historical knowledge of style to performances on their major instrument. This writing intensive class is for jazz majors only.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MUSI 3510 - SEA III: CUR PRAC/TECH AUD IND Course Description

    The primary goal of this course is to provide and in-depth discussion of digital audio theory as it relates to audio engineering. Topics include: Nyquist thorem, analog to digital conversion, digital to analog conversion oversampling, noise shaping, digital recording media, digital recording devices, digital editing systems, error correction/detection, simple digital signal processing, digital delivery systems, the Internet, fiber optics, the compact disc, DVD, film sound formats, high bit and sample rates, and data compression.This is a Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite:MUSI 2530

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 4440 - PERSONAL MGMT IN MUSIC Course Description

    A project management approach to the entrepreneurial aspects of personal management in the music and entertainment industry, including a study of the role of the personal manager in industry and his/her relationship to the contemporary artist. Field experiences in groups with weekly critiques of student group’s progress toward set objectives. Writing assignments include: several book reports, project management plan, case studies, reports on industry personnel, examination of corporate reports, and weekly reading on current state of the industry. For music management majors and minors only. This couse is Writing Intensive. Prerequisite: MUSI 1400

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    NUR 3250 - CULTURAL FOUNDATIONS NUR Course Description

    This course will explore the ways in which culture, race, ethnicity, gender, class, religious beliefs, sexual orientation and ability are related to health and health outcomes in individuals and populations. The implications that racism, classism, sexism and other systems of oppression have on individual as well as population health will be considered. Factors related to health disparities and health care inequities among and between patient populations will be examined with consideration given to the role of the nurse in promoting health. Emphasis will be placed on the value of providing patient centered care to diverse patient populations.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    NUR 3500 - NURSING RESEARCH Course Description

    Designed as a writing intensive course to help the student understand and utilize research concepts and methods by developing the ability to analyze, criticize, and interpret research. Students address the process of how research is applied to nursing practice through critiquing several published research studies and submitting an evidence-based practice project proposal. Prerequisite: MATH 1300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 3040 - HEALTH RESEARCH MTHDS I Course Description

    This course is the first part of a two course sequence. It introduces students to health research with an emphasis on population-based research methodologies. As a writing-intensive course, students will develop and use the critical skills needed to search the literature and construct a literature review on a selected health topic. Considerable attention is given to the process of scientific writing, identification of legitimate sources of health information, and the proper attribution to avoid plagiarism. Prerequisite: MATH 1300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 3280 - GLOBAL ENERGY SCI & TECH Course Description

    Intended for non-science majors, this course provides an introduction to the physical and technological principles behind various forms of energy production as well as its use and local/global environmental consequences. Topics include work, energy and power, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, electricity generation, fossil fuels, nuclear power, alternative/renewable energy sources and environmental risks/benefits. The course also examines cultural/societal differences in energy requirements, production and use across the globe. This is a descriptive non-laboratory course without the use of extensive mathematics.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 4800 - SEMINAR IN POL SCI Course Description

    This senior capstone course is designed as a major research seminar to demonstrate the skills and knowledge that have been acquired throughout the course of the major. Each seminar involves a detailed analysis of some topic in political science. Topics will vary from semester to semester, reflecting the instructor’s area of expertise. At least one seminar is offered each semester. Students may take more than one seminar. All sections of this course are writing-intensive. Prerequisite: POL 2020 AND (POL 2110 OR POL 2120) AND POL 2300 AND POL 2400

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 2030 - EXPERIMENTAL II:RESEARCH METH Course Description

    This course builds upon skills acquired by students in PSY 2020. Students continue their study of scientific methods with emphasis upon experimental techniques in the behavioral sciences. Students are trained in a wide range of methods for studying human and animal participants consistent with American Psychological Association guidelines for ethical research. Students will continue to learn to use sophisticated software for the management and analysis of data. This is a writing intensive course that will require students to complete a minimum of 15 pages of formal writing. 3. COURSE Prerequisite: PSY 2020

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 3750 - COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Course Description

    This course critically examines people's information processing capabilities and limitations. Emphasis is placed on the theoretical principles that underlie the attention, perception, and memory of events. Students will also be exposed to some of the research that has shed significant light on the nature ofcognition. As a writing intensive course, students will use writing-to-learn processes to engage both the conceptual and research aspects of cognition. they will also develop and use skills needed to present a research paper in APA style.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 3770 - PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC Course Description

    This course will examine current directions and the history of the Psychology of Music. Content may be comprised of low-level sensory interactions with sound; the relationship of music to intellectual development; the relationship between music theory and perceptional preferences; higher level issues of performance and expression in music; cultural influences and variation in music; and architectural acoustics and performance halls. To explore these topics, the course will be taught using a variety of reading and writing assignments, classroom presentations, and demonstrations. The course will be writing intensive with assignments that emphasize gaining depth and critical evaluation of this topic through the process of writing. Prerequisitie: PSY 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PSY 4800 - SEMINAR IN PSYCH Course Description

    This course serves as an integration of previous learning and an opportunity for the student to "pull it all together" where students review and evaluate what they have previously been exposed to and integrate and synthesis their learning into a coherent theoretical model of human behavior and thought. The course also serves as an opportunity for students to self-define what kind of theoretical orientations they privately endorse for the purposes of their own future development and growth. To these ends, students will be expected to display their knowledge coherently in written and oral form. This is a writing intensive course that will require students to complete a minimum of 15 pages of formal writing. Prerequisite: PSY 2030 AND PSY 2100 AND PSY 2200 AND PSY 2300 AND PSY 3500 AND PSY 3510 AND PSY 3530 AND (PSY 3540 OR PSY 3750 OR PSY 4200)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 2130 - SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY Course Description

    This course introduces students to the major theories and theorists in sociology through all historical periods. After an introductory consideration of the scientific method and its application to the study of human social life, it examines the principal categories of theory developed by sociologists. In addition to exploring the distinctive characteristics of each theoretical strategy, the course addresses such important issues as the relationship between theory and empirical research, the changing character of sociological theory over time, and the nature of theoretical controversies and debates in the field. Since this is a Writing Intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn sociological theories and as a way to develop proficiency in conventional styles of sociological writing. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 1010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 3010 - RESEARCH METHODS Course Description

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research methods, including the process by which research questions are formulated, relevant literature is reviewed, data are collected and analyzed, and results are written up. As this is a writing intensive course, students will learn methods in part through weekly writingassignments. A subset of these assignments will combine to form a research project in which students review the literature on a particular research question and present the results of basic data analysis. The end product of the course will be a research paper of approximately twenty pages that has been improved through an iterative process of feedback by the professor and revision by the student. All sections of this course are writing and technology intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 2130 OR CCJ 3680

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 3680 - CRIMINOLOGY Course Description

    This course will introduce to the students an overview of (1) the concepts of crime, law and criminology; (2) theories of crime causation; (3) the nature and extent and patterns of different kinds of crimes and social reactions towards the crimes in the American society; and (4) relevant crimes and social policies in other countries. As a writing intensive course, students will engage in writing both as a means to learn the concepts and theories outlined above and as a way to train themselves in conventional styles of criminological writing. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CCJ 2610

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 4850 - SENIOR SEMINAR IN SOCIOLOGY Course Description

    This research-based senior seminar course is an in-depth, critical analysis of the literature and social phenomena in the field of sociology. Each student is expected to selest a specific social organization, problem, or policy, explore the current research literature, complete an original independent research project and make a presentation about the empirical findings. Topics vary in each course section according to each instructor's pre-announced theme. This is a Writing Intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 2220 - ADV SPANISH COMPOSITION Course Description

    This course aims to increase students' ability to develop and express ideas effectively in written Spanish. It provides extensive practice in academic writing thorough the critical reading of literary and non-literary texts to understand the rhetorical process, to analyze audience and its cultural contexts, and to foresee audience responses. It is addressed to students at the intermediate-high/low-advanced level who have a good grasp of grammar and who need to develop their writing skills in Spanish. The course further reinforces grammatical concepts to enable students to communicate effectively through a process-driven approach. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: SPAN 2110

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 2330 - LATIN AMER LIT IN TRANSLATION Course Description

    This course examines Latin American writers and their contributions to world literature. Analyzing various literary genres, which may include short fiction, poetry, testimony or the novel, the course explores social, cultural, political, economic, and global influences that have shaped Latin American writing. Emphasis is placed on figures like: Pablo Neruda, Jorge L. Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Roberto Bolaño, Clarice Lispector, Cesar Vallejo, Cristina Peri Rossi, Isabel Allende, Diamela Eltit, Juan C. Onetti, Carlos Fuentes, García Márquez, Jose Martí, Gabriela Mistral, among others. This course is taught in English but Spanish majors who take it as directed elective are required to complete the writing intensive component in Spanish.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SPAN 2500 - LIT ANALYSIS & RES METH Course Description

    An introduction to bibliographical research and basic literary analytical methods and approaches, with attention to the exigencies of different genres and literary periods. The courses perfects the use of academic writing in Spanish, especially as it applies to the discipline of Spanish literature. It also provides an overview of the principal periods, movements, and trends of Peninsular and Latin American literary history and their historical contexts. This is a writing intensive course. Taught fully in Spanish Prerequisite: SPAN 2110

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 4980 - SPANISH CAPSTONE FOR SENIORS Course Description

    This course will synthesize Spanish and Latin American literature and cultural expression from their beginnings to the present. Literary movements and artistic tendencies will be studied along with representative works and authors. Emphasis will be placed on individual students’ career goals and overall career preparedness before graduation. This is a writing and technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPC 2550 - FOUND OF ED DIVERSE SOCIETY Course Description

    This introductory course for teacher candidates seeking dual licensure in regular and special education provides an educational knowledge base consisting of the philosophy, principles, theories, legislation, court decisions, and historical foundations for educating citizens, including those with disabilities, in a democratic society. State and CEC standards are used to define current practice and the expectations held for teacher candidates who in turn begin to construct their personal philosophies of education. Characteristics of learning and intellectual disabilities, emotional/behavioral disorders, and autism are presented. Particular attention is given to ways in which these characteristics impede the progress in the general education curriculum and the methods and strategies employed by teachers to maximize student success in inclusive settings. Candidates understand how primary language, culture and familial backgrounds interact with the k-12 student's disability to impact his/her academic skills, social abilities, attitudes, values, interests and career options. Elements of instructional planning are introduced. A 20-hour unsupervised field observation engaging k-12 students in an urban classroom setting is required as part of this course. In this writing intensive course, candidates receive instruction and practice in learning to write for multiple audiences in the field of education. Candidates apply their writing skills to express their ideas on education, to organize and summarize information on disabilites, to plan lessons, and to analyze factors that inform insturction. Multiple drafts with feedback are critical components of the writing process.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    WGS 3820 - GENDER & GLOBAL MIGRATION Course Description

    In the past fifty years global migration has emerged as one of the most significant social processes of our time. This course provides a general overview of contemporary global patterns of migration and examines the various social, cultural, and political contexts that shape the trends and characteristics of migratory flows. The main analytical focus of the course is the gendered patterns of migration, and its intersection with race, and other forms of social inequalities as they shape the experiences, treatment, and practices of inclusion and exclusion of immigrants in various countries around the world. Students will study how immigrant women and men experience work, the family, and communities, and how policies and political mobilization affect immigrants in various receiving contexts. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: WGS 1800

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    WGS 4100 - WGS CAPSTONE Course Description

    This senior level course focuses on theories of gender and issues relating to women's diversity. As a writing intensive course, students will use and develop their research and writing process skills to complete a major research paper in order to engage in feminist research. This is a writing intensive course, Prerequisite: WGS 2100 AND WGS/POL 2720 AND WGS 3100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



     
  • Technology Intensive - WPU is committed to a nurturing learning environment in which writing and technology literacies are taken seriously across disciplines. Many courses at WPU are designated as “WI” or “TI.” These are attributes to courses which could be in any major discipline or in the Core. •Four (4) Writing Intensive (WI) courses •Two (2) Technology Intensive (TI) courses


    UCC-Some Sec may be Tech Int
    HIST 2600 - HISTORICAL METHODS Course Description

    This course is foundational for History majors. It focuses on the theory and practice of historcal thinking and wsriting and emphasizes research and writing methods and skills. History majors must take this course duing their first semesters of coursework in the Major, and cannot take 400 level (capstone) courses without successfully completing History 2600. All sections of the course are Writing Intensive; some lsections of the course are proposed to be Technology Intensive. Fifteen pages of finished writing are required, including a research paper. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    UCC-Technology Intensive
    ACCT 3200 - ACCT INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Description

    This course is designed to prepare students how to use technology during the accounting process. The course takes a transaction cycles approach to AIS that focuses conceptually on the primary sources of data, data flows, logical tasks, accounting records, and internal control and EDP auditing. It also teaches students how to use full-fledged commercial accounting software (QuickBooks.) This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite:ACCT 2120 and ACCT 3110.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ANTH 3010 - RESEARCH METHODS IN ANTH Course Description

    This course provides student with basic tools for designing, conducting and appraising ethnographic research projects. Students will gain a better understanding of qualitative and quantitative methods through collaborative research, field activities and class discussions. Emphasis will be placed on using techniques for data collection and analyses, evaluating research procedures and outcomes, and developing technological skills appropriate for the discipline of Anthropology. This is a technology intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only. Prerequisite: ANTH 2300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 1800 - DIGITAL METHODS Course Description

    ARTS 1800 is the introduction to the fundamental principles of digital technology in art and design. Students will gain practical understanding of hardware, software, internet technologies and computer file organization. Topics such as saving, printing, scanning, computer systems and preferences - as well as introductory look at the Adobe software suite will be introduced. Additionally, students will gain an understanding of file formats in order to archive work on external drives and internet portfolio sites. Students will continue to explore basic principles of design using digital technology - and expand their understanding of visual concepts and the creative process.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 2510 - TYPOGRAPHY FORM & APPLIC Course Description

    This course is the study of typography as a form of design and communication. This includes study and research of type terminology, letter anatomy, typeface style and the history of typography. The course will investigate type and image as it relates to page layout, posters, books and digital process. Emphasis will be placed on student concepts, design exploration, research and project presentation. This class is Technology Intensive. Prerequisite: ARTS 2500

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 2700 - PHOTOGRAPHY I Course Description

    ARTS 2700 is an introduction to the fundamental principles of digital photography as applied in fine art, documentary, photojournalism and commercial applications. It the foundation course required course for photography majors. Students will gain practical understanding of manipulating a digital single lens reflex 35mm camera (DSLR) and out putting images for the web and print through an introduction to hardware,software, internet technologies and computer file organization. Topics range from managing light by balancing meter reading by controlling the ISO, aperture, shutter speed to saving to computer software as Adobe Bridge Camera RAW, Photoshop and Lightroom for web and print output. In class presentations of current photography industry standards, as well as historical and contemporary work is an integral aspect of this class and lay the groundwork to editing and meaningful image content. Students will be instructed in archive files in various formats on external drives to produce web and print images. Along with inkjet print or digital c-prints, students will create an internet portfolio presented on template website, live on the internet, as part of their final project. Students will explore the basic principles of digital capture in photography, and expand their understanding of visual literacy and the creative process in photography. Thisis a Technology Intensive course. Prerequisite: ARTS 1800

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 2820 - INTRO TO PUBLICATION DESIGN Course Description

    This course covers layout and project optimization in InDesign, with a particular focus on publication design and multi-page documents. The course fuses design techniques with professional practice and technical skills. Students will critique the design of existing publications and develop their own page layouts. We will cover image formats, two and four-color printing, typographic refinement, use of style sheets, and kerning and tracking. InDesign’s text, image and layout management tools will be covered in depth. All projects will be produced in InDesign. This is a Technology Intensive course. Prerequisite: ARTS 1800

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 2850 - 3D COMP GRAPHICS I - MODELING Course Description

    This course will introduce beginners to the art of creating interesting,usable, and well-designed virtual 3D Models using advanced 3D modeling and animation software. Students will learn the tools and techniques for creating well-designed models for use in artwork, illustration and animation. This is a Technology Intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 3520 - ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHY Course Description

    This course is a comprehensive overview of every aspect of designing with type. Students investigate typography in both traditional and experimental page layout, logotype design, and the history of typography. Students also analyze and create typographic solutions for interactive and multimedia experiences. Emphasis is placed on student concepts, design exploration, research, and craft. Students gain a greater understanding of typographic design principals and continue to develop a personal and professional design aesthetic. This class is Technology Intensive. Prerequisites: ARTS 2510 and ARTS 2820.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTS 3830 - WEB DESIGN I Course Description

    This course introduces beginners to the art of creating interesting, intelligent, usable, and well-designed Web sites. Students wll learn the tools and techniques for creating a well-designed interactive web site:HTML, CSS, user-interface, design and aesthetics, internet history, browser differences, usability and navigationfile transfers, roll overs, java applets, web design authoring software, real world strategies, and a brief introduction to support programs. Prerequisites: ARTS 2820 AND ARTS 2990

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 3850 - 3D COMP GRAPHIC II-INTRO ANIM Course Description

    This course will introduce beginners to the art of animating interesting, intelligent, usable, and well designed virtual 3D Models that they create using advanced 3D modeling, animation and video editing software. Students will learn the tools, techniques and aesthetic sensibilities of time-based media to enable them to create entry-level quality 3D animated sequences for video and film. This is a Technology Intensive course. Prerequisite: ARTS 2850

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 4830 - INTERACTV ONLINE MEDIA Course Description

    Interactive multimedia incorporates elements of traditional visual art, design, movement, sound, video, the internet, photography, animation, as well as the elements of time and human interaction. You can incorporate some or all of these elements into such things as web sites( web art, web games, toys, greeting cards. etc.), CD_ROMS, corporate presentations, interactive games, installation art, digita protfolios, etc. In this course we are going to create web-based interactive projects that are both visually and mentally stimulating, creative, intelligent, and aethetically pleasing as well as technically proficient. Prerequisites: ARTS 2820 AND ARTS 3830

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    ARTS 4840 - INTERACTV MULTIMEDIA Course Description

    This course introduces beginners to the aesthetics and techniques of creating interactive content for output to DVD. Using multimedia authoring tools, students can create DVDs, multi-user environments, Web games, interactive video, and virtual environments, as well as projected art installations. Emphasis is on navigation techniques, user-friendly features, interface design, basic programming, creativity, and the history and future of multimedia. Prerequisites: ARTS 2820 AND ARTS 2990 AND ARTS 3830

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ARTS 4850 - WEB DESIGN II Course Description

    This course will introduce intermediate web students to more advanced coding, design and usability for websites. Students will learn advanced tools and techniques for creating well-designed interactive Web Sites. This is a Technology Intensive course. Prerequisites: ARTS 2820 AND ARTS 3830

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3060 - CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. We discuss popular belief systems, popular religions and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. We also look at contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, film, television, and music. These subjects are studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English. (Cross-listed: CHIN 3020)

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    ASN 3620 - MAKING JAPAN POP CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in cultural transformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of "globalization." We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre, cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite: One 1000-level course in History.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    BIO 2050 - CELL BIOLOGY Course Description

    A study of the physiological and biochemical processes that regulate and maintain cell function. Cellular and subcellular structures are studied particularly as applicable to cell function. Prerequisite: BIO 1630

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    BIO 2060 - GENERAL GENETICS Course Description

    A study of some of the basic principles and laws of genetics as revealed by modern molecular-genetic approaches. The intention is to familiarize the student with the organization and properties of hereditary material (nucleic acids) and highlight some of the critical experiments that laid the foundations of our understanding. All sections of this course are technology intensive. Prerequisite: BIO 1630

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CCJ 3010 - RESEARCH METHODS Course Description

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research methods, including the process by which research questions are formulated, relevant literature is reviewed, data are collected and analyzed, and results are written up. As this is a writing intensive course, students will learn methods in part through weekly writing assignments. A subset of these assignments will combine to form a research project in which students review the literature on a particular research question and present the results of basic data analysis. The end product of the course will be a research paper of approximately twenty pages that has been improved through an iterative process of feedback by the professor and revision by the student. All sections of this course are writing and technology intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 2130 OR CCJ 3680

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CCJ 3020 - DATA ANALYSIS Course Description

    This course introduces students to approaches for assembling, analyzing and presenting data. Students will become familiar with a variety of sociologically relevant data that are available online. Students will learn how to conduct data analyses in SPSS or Excel in order to address questions of sociological and criminological significance. Students will also learn how to interpret the results of their analyses. This is a technology intensive course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 3010 OR CCJ 3010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CHEM 4280 - BIOCHEMISTRY II Course Description

    This course elaborates on topics discussed in CHEM 4270 (Biochemistry) and extends students’ knowledge of biochemistry to include the primary catabolic and anabolic pathways. Topics covered include the TCA cycle, electron transport chains and the mechanisms of replication, transcription and translation. This course covers many of the key techniques used in metabolomics and in the elucidation of biochemical pathways. This is a writing and technology intensive course. Prerequisite: CHEM 4270

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    CHIN 3020 - CHINESE POPULAR CULTURE Course Description

    Examines the Chinese culture made and consumed by ordinary Chinese people, and analyzes how some of the critical Chinese ideological, political, social, and cultural factors are shaped in popular culture. Deals with popular belief systems, popular religions, and religious activities, domestic and communal rituals and customs, various forms of popular performance, folk literature, and material culture. Also considers contemporary Chinese popular culture including arts, flim, television, and music. These subjects are studied through both written and visual documentation. Taught in English.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIEC 2130 - TEACHING YC IN A TECH WORLD Course Description

    This course explores the integration of computers and other technology into the developmentally appropriate early childhood classroom. Teacher-candidates will learn how to select and evaluate software, appropriate werbsites, introduce children to technology, integrate computers across the curriculum, utilize computers to promote an anti-bias curriculum, and to communicate with families. Teacher-candidates will explore universal design and the many hardware and software options available for children with secial needs ( i.e. autism). Additionally, teacher candidates will use computers to plan curriculum and connect with the broader professional community. Prerequisite: ANTH 2020 AND PSY 2100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIEE 2130 - TEACH IN A TECH WORLD Course Description

    This is an introductory course in the use of educational and assistive technology in the teaching and learning process. Teacher candidates will learn how to infuse technology into the curriculum to address NJCCCS and technology literacy standards as well as meet the needs of learners from diverse backgrounds (e.g., differences in social class, gender, race, ethnicity, language, sexual orientation, age, and special needs). Toward the end of the course, candidates will also explore the use of technology to create and electronic protfolio for their own professional development. Prerequisite: ANTH 2020 AND PSY 1100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CIRL 3350 - LITERACY, TECH&INSTRUCTION Course Description

    This course is offered as a required course for students seeking secondary certification. The course is designed to help prospective teachers construct a theoretical knowledge base and a practical conceptual understanding of content area reading instruction. Specifically, students will learn different teaching and learning strategies in the content areas and will select, plan, and design materials for content area instruction. Candidates will develop their teaching skills, and particularly their ability to identify and address the educational needs of individual students, by tutoring a K-12 student during a supervised field experience. ART, PE, and Music students can complete the tutoring in K-12 classrooms. All other subject areas must complete the field work in 6-12 classrooms. Prerequisite: CIED 2030

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CODS 3730 - SCIENCE & MEASURING HEARING Course Description

    This course will cover the physical characteristics of sound and its measurements, the basic acoustics of speech, and the anatomy and physiology of peripheral and central auditory mechanisms. Basic test procedures for the estimation of air-conduction and bone conduction thresholds, the assessment of middle ear function, and speech comprehension will be covered as well. This is a technology intensive course. Course offered Fall Semester only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2260 - VIDEO PROD & EDITING Course Description

    This is a television production course designed for students in media production, broadcast journalism and public relations. It is specific to field production. Students are asked to explore topics and use various techniques for bringing these topics to an audience. Students develop skills in script writing, short composition, audio recording, lighting and editing.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 2270 - TV STUDIO PRODUCTION Course Description

    This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a solid foundation of studio production including theory, aesthetics and operational techniques of studio television equipment. It is a lecture and workshop-oriented class which will provide students with opportunities to write, direct and produce in a variety of television program formats, and to learn the responsibilities of every production crewmember by practicing each role on a rotational basis throughout the sememster. This is a technology intensive course that is for COMM majors only.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 3580 - DIGITAL & SOCIAL MEDIA COMM Course Description

    This course will explore various online and social platforms and teach the strategic approach to using the technological tools for communication and public relations. Students will examine real-world cases, explore the latest strategies for engaging audiences using various online platforms and learn the tactical use of core online and social platforms. Both theoretical foundations and practical applications of online/social communications will be studied. Students will create, run and evaluate a digital communication campaign for a selected product, service or organization. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 2100

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4630 - SEMINAR GROUP&TEAM DEVELOPMENT Course Description

    Students learn and apply theory, strategies and skills of competent team membership in small group problem solving situations that are consistent with professional and social organization settings. Emphasis is placed on developing leadership styles, locating, analyzing and presenting information employing communication information technology. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: COMM 3600

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    COMM 4640 - TECHNOLOGY & SOCIETY Course Description

    Throughout history, communication technologies have allowed people to transcend the limits of face-to-face communication. This course will survey the development of information and communication technologies, with a focus on the impact these technologies have made on communication practices in individual, relational, small group, organizational, cultural, and global contexts.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 1300 - INTRO TO VISUAL BASIC Course Description

    Students will be ntroduced to the basic principles and applications of computing systems, microcomputers in particular. Techniques of computer programming are introduced through the use of VISUAL BASIC. This course is not for computer science majors. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 2010 - COMPUTER & INFO TECHNOLOGY Course Description

    The course has two themes. The first theme introduces computer concepts. Topics include hardware and software fundamentals; computer and information systems; data communications and computer networks; World Wide Web and the Internet; social impact of computers including discussions on privacy, security, civil liberty, risk of computers, intellectual properties, and computer related legislations. The second theme familiarizes students with leading applicaton software such as Excel, Powerpoint, Access and Web design programs. Practical computer problem-solving skills are emphasized through intensive hands-on exercises. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 2150 - COMP & INFO TECH FOR EDUCATORS Course Description

    This course is designed to meet the ISTE National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers. It introduces the concepts, the skill, and the capabilities necessary to effectively use computers and information technology. With an emphasis on fundamentals, students can easily adapt to the rapid change of computing technologies. The basic concepts include hardware and software fundamentals, telecommunications computer networking, electronic media, and data processing. The legal, ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology are also discussed. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 2300 - COMPUTER SCIENCE I Course Description

    This course is the foundation course for the Computer Science program which is one of the most high-technology academic curriculums. The topics include algorithimic approaches to computer problem solving and programming methodology. analyisis, design, writing , compilation, execution, documentation, implementation, debugging, and evaluation of a computer program with procedural abstraction and baisc data representation. Substantial programming assignments ( in aNSI C/C++ language) is emphasized, including problem solving in numerical, applied to mathematical, science, business and other areas as well as non-numerical applications. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: MATH 1150 OR MATH 1350

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 2400 - COMPUTER SCIENCE II Course Description

    The course is a continuation of CS 2300. it focuses on object-oriented programming (OOP) and UNIX technologies. Main topics covered int he courses include: procedural abstraction, data representation, recursion, and program modularity. File processing, data management, and storage allocation techniques. Abstract data type (ADT) and object-oriented programming techniques. Key concepts in software design. Multidimensional arrays, strings, pointers, and records. Students complete programming assignments in C++. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CS 2300

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 3500 - SOFTWARE ENGINEERING Course Description

    This course provides a hands-on experience with the issues and techniques of software engineering. A team project applying the techniques covered is the main focus of the course. This course introduces the fundamental princples and practices of the software development process to produce quality software sytems. Several developmental paradigms, processes, models and methods will be discussed. The topics cover the entire software lfecycle that includes requirement analysis and specification, design, implementation, testing, integration, maintenance/evolution, documentation, and project management. The course also introduces APIs, CASE tools and environments, as well as the UML ( Unified Modeling Language). Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: CS 3420

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    CS 4800 - COMPUTER SCIENCE SEMINAR Course Description

    This is the capstone course required of all computer science majors. The course is conducted in seminar form featuring internal as well as external speakers. Approximately two-thirds of the course covers current topics of interest in computer science and computing technology; the remaining one-third of the course is dedicated to social impact of computers and ethical issues faced by today's computer professionals. Students are required to select a relevant topic and complete a substantial research-oriented project either individually or as a team. As the end of the project, students are expected to submit a substantial written report and orally present it to the public. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    FIN 4450 - FINANCE INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to integrate financial concepts with technical skills in the analysis of financial markets and to apply technologies to evaluate and analyze theories learned in fundamental financial courses. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: FIN 3200

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    FINP 4700 - FINANCIAL PLANNING CAPSTONE Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to integrate all of your personal financial planning knowledge and apply that knowledge to create a comprehensive fianancial plan using professional software. Prerequisite: FIN 3600 OR FINP 3600

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 2030 - INTRO TO GEO INFO SCI & TECH Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the concepts, methods, and applications involved in Geographic Information Sciences and Techniques, which includes digital Cartography, Aerial Photo Interpretation, Image Processing, Remote Sensing, Computer Mapping, Global Positioning System (GPS), and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Some of the topics that will be covered include spatial data structure, coordinate and projection systems, spatial data collection and integration, data generalization and classification, the functionality of GIS and different Geospatial Techniques, data integration, geographical analysis, and applications on urban, demographic, resource, environment, and social issues. The lectures and lab exercises will provide introductory knowledge, basic skills, and practical experience of GISciences and Techniques needed in research and professional work. This is a technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    GEO 4010 - COMPUTER CARTOGRAPHY Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the concepts, methods, and applications involved iN Computer Mapping Techniques using Geographic Information Sciences (GIS). Some of the topics that will be covered include spatial data structure, coordinate and projection systems, spatial data collection, spatial data quality control, sources of data errors and accessing data quality, data generalization and classification, map projection and scale, mapping changes over time, Thematic mapping, mapping point phenomena, color and pattern, symbolization, data integration, the functionality of GIS, cartographic analysis, cartographic design, and applications on urban, demographic, resource, environment, and social issues. The lectures and lab exercises will provide introductory knowledge, basic skills, and practical experience of Computer Mapping Techniques needed in research and professional work. This is a technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    GEO 4030 - GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to expose students to the concepts, methods, and applications involved in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). It combines an overview of the principles of GIS and practical experiences in the analytical use of spatial information. Some of the topics that will be covered include the components and functionality of GIS, GIS data structure, location and coordinate Systems, spatial data collection and integration, management and measurement of spatial data, single and multiple-layer operations, spatial correlation analysis, geographical analysis, and applications on urban, demographic, resource, environment, and social issues. During the semester, students will gain advanced knowledge and skills with GIS needed in their research and professional work. Prerequisite: GEO 4010

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    HIST 2220 - TECHNOLOGY WORLD HISTORY Course Description

    An introduction to the way technology has shaped world history, from the emergence of agrarian-based ancient civilizations to the Twentieth Century. Following an introduction to the earliest recorded human technology, the course will focus on the role of technology in key historical periods: the ancient agrarian civilizations; technological innovation in Early Modern Afro-Eurasia; the New Science, the Industrial Revolutions, and the rise of the West; and the acceleration of technological innovation in the interconnected contemporary world. Throughout, the course will touch on technology’s impact on society, culture, the individual, gender roles, and the environment as well as changing balance of power among world regions. This course is Technology Intensive. Prerequisite: HIST 1010 OR HIST 1020 OR HIST 1030 OR HIST 1040 OR HIST 1050

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    HIST 3620 - MAKING JAPAN POP CULTURE Course Description

    This course examines contemporary Japanese popular culture from historical and theoretical perspectives. Learning how Japan was both impacted by and contributed to worldwide trends in culturaltransformation over the past several centuries requires critical analysis of the very notion of "globalization." We analyze recent cultural materials to view Japanese culture as it is now, while examining classic examples of cultural adoption and adaptation from earlier periods of cultural creation in Japan with global impact. The objects and practices studied are wide-ranging, including wood-block prints, political and national symbols, architecture, advertising, visual and print media, literature, theatre,cinema, animé, manga, fashion, music, food, and art. The course centers on active student engagement with and manipulation of these cultural forms through active testing and calibration of cultural theory enhanced by technology. Prerequisite: One 1000-level History course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    KNES 2300 - TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS Course Description

    A study of the role of evaluation in physical education, the organization and administration of a testing program, and appropriate statistical methods used in a testing program. Prerequisite: (MATH 1300 OR KNES 1200) AND BIO 1180

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    KNES 3300 - BIOMECHANICS Course Description

    The study of human motion, which includes the structure and function of the various systems that contribute to movement. Special emphasis is placed on the bones, joints, and muscles as links in the production of movement. Also emphasized is the biomechanical analysis of motion, and the analysis of motion using advanced technological tools available in this discipline. Prerequisite: PHYS 1100 AND BIO 1180

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    LAS 3290 - MIGRATION & DISP IN SPAN LIT Course Description

    This course explores migration and displacement theories as they apply to the narrative and film of Spanish migration. It studies the flow of peoples between Latin America and Spain and between African countries and Spain. Students will utilize theories learned int he course to identify and analyze specific case studies within their community dealing with problems such as displaced identities, language, legal and educational barriers, and anti-immigrant discourses. This is a Technology Intensive course. The course is taught fully in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MGT 3050 - MGMT INFORMATION SYSTEMS Course Description

    This course is an overview of information systems at different levels of an organization. It addresses current technology, its impact on organizations, and its management. The evolving role of information systems and related technology within a business organization is also studied. The learning process is enhanced by means of critically studying and analyzing, with the support of information technologies, real business cases. Prerequisite: MGT 2000

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 1510 - AUDIO RECORDING FOR MUSICIANS Course Description

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the technological concepts, practices, history, and equipment used by the professional audio industry and its applications to the home studio. Topics will include: acoustics fundamentals, microphone technology, audio recording technology, loudspeakers, computers in audio, control room and studio acoustics, new and emerging technologies, and audio over the internet. Students will use internet-based information as well as internet-based technology to fulfill assignments. This is primarily a lecture course with regular demonstrations. This course is Technology Intensive.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 1580 - MUSIC TECHNOLOGY I Course Description

    A study of the most important technologies used for musical applications. Students gain experience working with state-of-the-art equipment, exploring topics such as analog and digital representations of sound, computer hardware and operating system software, sound synthesis MIDI and MIDI sequencing, music notation on the computer, musical resources on the inernet, and applicaton and uses of music technology in educaiton. Emphaisis in the practical uses of technology in the music profession as well as concerns about ethical use of technology are discussed.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2510 - SEA I:FUNDMNT & TRANSDUC Course Description

    The primary goal of this course is to provide an in-depth discussion of transducers and transducer theory as it relates to audio engineering including: microphone theory and types, magnetic recording principles and applications, mixing console signal flow and design, and loudspeaker theory and design. Primary auditory physiology and theory are presented and principles of wave motion, electricity, and acoustics are introduced. Students will submit written homework assignments, daily journal entries, and keep a comprehensive notebook of all class information as well as related audio information gathered through other readings and experiences. This is a writing and technology intensive course. Prerequisite: MUSI 1510

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2580 - ELECTRONIC MUSIC I Course Description

    An introduction to electronic music with hands-on experience in the basics of subtractive, FM, and digital synthesis. Emphasis placed on MIDI and computer applications. No prior experience on synthesizer necessary. Most assignments and projects are to be completed during required lab time. Ability to read music required. Placement test is given at first class meeting. Prerequisite: MUSI 1240

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    MUSI 2590 - ELECTRONIC MUSIC II Course Description

    A continuation of Electronic Music I with hands-on lab experience of music synthesis, sampling, digital audio, and production. Emphasis will be placed on imaginative musical applications of technology and the role of technology in the music profession and in society as a whole, including legal and ethical implications (software priacy, file sharing, etc.). Most assignments and projects are to be completed during the required lab time. Prerequisite: MUSI 2580

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MUSI 3461 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP FOR MUSICIANS Course Description

    This course is designed to provide an overview of all areas of self-promotion and marketing including print media, the world wide web, social media, public relations, and networking. Projects will include the creation of a web presence through a website and electronic press kit, the creation of a social media presence, the creation of a business/marketing plan as it relates to a career in teaching, performance, composition, music business, or professional audio areas.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    MUSI 3680 - COMPOSITION FOR MEDIA Course Description

    This course is designed to provide an overview of the technological concepts, practices, history and techniques used by composers for visual media, such as film, television, advertising, video games and interactive media. Topics will include: spotting, scoring, mixing, licensing and networking. Students will use technological resources to create music to accompany visual media, using actual clips and sample job descriptions from the current marketplace. Terminology and procedures will be discussed while studying examples and composing works that display mastery of the concepts learned. Students' work in the course will result in a portfolio of work which students can showcase online. This is a Technology Intensive course.

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    NUR 3280 - NURSING PRACTICE I Course Description

    This course introduces the historical perspectives on nursing as well as the concept of professional nursing. The roles of the nurse in relation to care of the sick, health promotion, and population based care are explored in relation to theoretical concepts / constructs and the competencies required in each role. Students have opportunities to develop knowledge and skills required in safe and competent nursing care of clients across the age span in various health care settings. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: BIO 3120 AND PBHL 2210

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    NUR 4260 - NURSING PRACTICE III Course Description

    This course prepares the student for independence in nursing and for collaborative interdisciplinary work in acute care settings. Clinical experience will emphasize outcomes of care that will maximize health management and reduce risks of complications. Students will apply the concepts of leasership and management theory to nursing.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PBHL 3042 - HEALTH RESEARCH METHODS II Course Description

    This course is the second part of a two course sequence. It introduces students to advanced concepts in a population-based health research by building upon the content and skills introduced in PBHL 3040. As a technology-intensive course, students will develop and use the skills needed to plan and conduct a health survey including analyzing and presenting the results in a final research report. Students will develop and use the research and technology skills needed to critically analyze and interpret scientific literature relevant to current public health problems. Prerequisite: PBHL 3040

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    PHIL 2320 - PHILOSOPHY OF TECHNOLOGY Course Description

    Philosophy of technology studies the structure and purpose of technology. It examines the basic conceptual foundations of technology as a complex system with something like a life of its own. It examines how deep biological and religious drives animate the development of technology. It looks at advanced technologies, especially those that involve modification of the human body or human nature

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1300 - PHYSICS FOR INFORMATION AGE Course Description

    Intended for non-science students, this course provides an introductory survey of the principles that underlie modern communication technology. Topics include applications of classical and quantum physics to the developement of semiconductor integrated circuits, solid-state lasers and optical fibers. This is a descriptive laboratory course without the use of extensive mathematics. The laboratory presents a set of experiments that highlight the physical principles presented in lecture. This is a technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 1900 - ACOUSTICS AND SOUND Course Description

    The lecture topics provide a description of the fundamental principles of acosustics and sound that include: simple harmonic motion, basic wave phenomena, analysis and synthesis of complex waves, the human ear and voice, basic room and auditorium acoustics, and the basic operating principles of microphones, speakers, and audio equipment. The laboratory presents a set of experiments that highlight the physical principles presented in lecture. Lecture and lab.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PHYS 3280 - GLOBAL ENERGY SCI & TECH Course Description

    Intended for non-science majors, this course provides an introduction to the physical and technological principles behind various forms of energy production as well as its use and local/global environmental consequences. Topics include work, energy and power, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, electricity generation, fossil fuels, nuclear power, alternative/renewable energy sources and environmental risks/benefits. The course also examines cultural/societal differences in energy requirements, production and use across the globe. This is a descriptive non-laboratory course without the use of extensive mathematics.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    POL 2020 - RESEARCH METHODS POL SCIENCE Course Description

    This course will enable students to do research in Political Science and critically evaluate political science literature. Topics include understanding and applying social scientific methods, utilizing library resources/databases to enhance information literacy, the collection, analysis and evaluation of qualitative and quantitative data, survey research, and the use and misuse of statistics. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: POL 1100 OR POL 1200

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 2020 - EXPERIMENTAL I:APPL STAT Course Description

    Applied Statistics provides an introduction to basic statistical procedures for the behavioral sciences, including probability theory, hypothesis testing, and descriptive and inferential statistics. Students learn how to use and select among a variety of statistical tests such as z-statistics, t-tests, analysis of variance, and correlation, as well as nonparametric tests such as chi-square. Technology intensive laboratory sessions train students in the use computer software to analyze data and create graphs that are appropriate for the sciences.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 2030 - EXPERIMENTAL II:RESEARCH METH Course Description

    This course builds upon skills acquired by students in PSY 2020. Students continue their study of scientific methods with emphasis upon experimental techniques in the behavioral sciences. Students are trained in a wide range of methods for studying human and animal participants consistent with American Psychological Association guidelines for ethical research. Students will continue to learn to use sophisticated software for the management and analysis of data. This is a writing intensive course that will require students to complete a minimum of 15 pages of formal writing. 3. COURSE Prerequisite: PSY 2020

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    PSY 3520 - PSYCHOLINGUISTICS Course Description

    This course explores the relationships between psychology and linguistics, the brain areas that are implicated in language processing, the cognitive functions that are involved in psycholinguistic processes, the developmental aspects of psycholinguistics and the methods and techniques that are currently used in this field. In addition to a historical perspective, this course will also discuss the role of multi-cultural issues and the impact of current research findings. This is a technology intensive course that involves training and projects that use speech analysis software, recording equipment and auditory capture, linguistic analysis, and related technological tools for the detection and synthesis of speech and language. Prerequisite: PSY 1100

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    RPS 3200 - SALES INFO SYSTEMS & TECH Course Description

    This course is an introduction to hands-on instruction for selected information technology resources that ordinarily support the sales professional and the sales process. It includes the selection of productivity tools, sales team applications and enterprise-wide technology solutions. This is a technology intensive course. Prerequisite: RPS 2050

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SOC 3010 - RESEARCH METHODS Course Description

    This course is designed to familiarize students with the process of social scientific inquiry. Students will learn the fundamentals of social science research methods, including the process by which research questions are formulated, relevant literature is reviewed, data are collected and analyzed, and results are written up. As this is a writing intensive course, students will learn methods in part through weekly writingassignments. A subset of these assignments will combine to form a research project in which students review the literature on a particular research question and present the results of basic data analysis. The end product of the course will be a research paper of approximately twenty pages that has been improved through an iterative process of feedback by the professor and revision by the student. All sections of this course are writing and technology intensive. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 2130 OR CCJ 3680

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SOC 3020 - DATA ANALYSIS Course Description

    This course introduces students to approaches for assembling, analyzing and presenting data. Students will become familiar with a variety of sociologically relevant data that are available online. Students will learn how to conduct data analyses in SPSS or Excel in order to address questions of sociological and criminological significance. Students will also learn how to interpret the results of their analyses. This is a technology intensive course. Course offered Fall and Spring Semesters. Prerequisite: SOC 3010 OR CCJ 3010

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPAN 3290 - MIGRATION & DISP IN SPAN LIT Course Description

    This course explores migration and displacement theories as they apply to the narrative and film of Spanish migration. It studies the flow of peoples between Latin America and Spain and between African countries and Spain. Students will utilize theories learned int he course to identify and analyze specific case studies within their community dealing with problems such as displaced identities, language, legal and educational barriers, and anti-immigrant discourses. This is a Technology Intensive course. The course is taught fully in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 2500

    Term Offered: This course is not being offered at this time.



    SPAN 4980 - SPANISH CAPSTONE FOR SENIORS Course Description

    This course will synthesize Spanish and Latin American literature and cultural expression from their beginnings to the present. Literary movements and artistic tendencies will be studied along with representative works and authors. Emphasis will be placed on individual students’ career goals and overall career preparedness before graduation. This is a writing and technology intensive course.

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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    SPC 3130 - ADAPTIVE & ASSISTIVE TECH Course Description

    This lab-based course explores technologies that enhance the educational experience for learners in the 21st century classroom. Technologies and strategies based on The Principles of Universal Design for Learning will be addressed in order to equitably support student learning according to the diversity and ability of each learner. Students will explore various no, low, mid and high tech assistive technology tools designed to assist learners in achieving academic goals and objectives. The integration of assistive technologies in lesson plans and asessments will be a main focus, as well as the integration of augmentative/alternative communication systems for learners with limited functional communication skills. Prerequisite: SPC 2550

    Term Offered: Fall 2014
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